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Maps of Wisconsin

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SDUK Wisconsin
SDUK. "North America/ Sheet V The North West and Michigan Territories." London: SDUK & Baldwin & Cradock, 1833. 15 1/4 x 12 1/8. Engraving by J. & C. Walker. Original outline hand-coloring. Full margins. Excellent condition.

A detailed and cleanly drawn map of the old Northwest and Michigan Territories issued by the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK). This wonderful English enterprise was devoted to the spreading of up-to-date information and the enhancing of understanding. This map shows in detail the area around Lake Michigan during an important transitional period just following the Black Hawk War. Michigan is shown just four years before statehood when settlement extended only half way up the peninsula. Wisconsin is depicted one year before Milwaukee was founded and three years before it became a state. Altogether, a fine example of the Society's work. $225



Mitchell Wisconsin
"Wisconsin." From A New Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1846. 14 1/2 x 11 1/4. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Original hand-coloring. Spot at right, not affecting state landmass. Else, very good condition.

An fine Wisconsin map by S. Augustus Mitchell, issued the year of statehood. For much of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the Mitchell firm dominated American cartography in output and influence. S. Augustus Mitchell Jr.'s maps of the 1860s are probably the best known issues of this firm, but his father's earlier efforts are excellent maps derived from H.S. Tanner's atlas of the 1830s. This early map of Wisconsin is a good example of this work. Topographical information, including towns, rivers, roads, etc. is clearly shown, and the counties are shaded with contrasting pastel shades. The map shows Wisconsin just having been made a state, and settlement is limited to the southeast; in the northwest only two counties are shown. It is obvious from the quality and attractive appearance of this map why Mitchell's firm became so important. A fine early American cartographic document of the state. $325



Thomas Cowperthwait Wisconsin
"A New Map of the State of Wisconsin." Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1850. 15 3/4 x 13 1/8. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Full original hand color. Paper somewhat toned. Very good condition.

A strong, beautifully crafted map of Wisconsin from the mid-nineteenth century, published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co. This firm took over the publication of S. Augustus Mitchell's important Universal Atlas in 1850, and they continued to produce up-dated maps that were amongst the best issued in the period. The map is filled with myriad topographical details, including rivers, towns, lakes, political borders. The state's principal meridian is shown in bold line, and the US survey lines are indicated throughout the lower half of the state. This is the area where most of the development is shown in the state, with towns, surveyed counties and a burgeoning road network. The northern half of the state is divided into just a five counties and shows little settlement. This is a fascinating Wisconsin document from mid-century. $250



J.H. Young. "No. 15. Map of the States of Michigan & Wisconsin." From Mitchell's School and Family Geography. Philadelphia: S.A. Mitchell, 1852. 8 1/4 x 10 1/2. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate by J.H. Young. Original hand wash. Very good condition.

An excellent map of Wisconsin and Michigan from the mid 19th century. The map depicts topographical information with clear precision, marking towns, rivers, roads, and counties. Historically and geographically, a fine map from early in Wisconsin's history. $60



"Milwaukee." 1854. 8 x 4 5/8. Wood engraving. Large spot at top; a few small scattered spots. Else, very good condition. $35



Colton Wisconsin
J.H. Colton. "Wisconsin." New York: J.H. Colton, 1856. 15 5/8 x 12 3/4. Lithograph. Full original hand-coloring. Full margins. Light time toning. Else, very good condition.

In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of map publishing in America moved from Philadelphia to New York. The Colton publishing firm played a large role in this shift. This map of Wisconsin, with its fine detail, is a strong example of their successful work. The map presents the counties with contrasting pastel shades, and includes depictions of towns, roads, railroads, rivers, and some topography. Each feature is labeled neatly, and the information given extends to beyond the borders of the state. $225



Colton Wisconsin
County Map of Michigan, and Wisconsin." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1860. 10 3/4 x 13 3/8. Lithograph. Bright original hand color. Very good condition.

The first of a series of attractive maps of the two parallel states by Philadelphia publisher S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr.. Typical of his maps, the detail is clearly presented, with special attention paid to the roads and railroads in these important mid-west states. Surrounded by a decorative border and with bright original color. $150



Johnson: Wisconsin & Michigan
"Johnson's Michigan and Wisconsin." New York: Johnson & Ward, ca. 1865. 17 3/8 x 24. Lithograph. Original hand color. Faint waterstain in bottom margin. Otherwise, very good condition.

A detailed early map of Wisconsin and Michigan by A.J. Johnson. Johnson, who published out of New York City, was one of the leading cartographic publishers in the latter half of the century, producing popular atlases, geographies and so on. This finely detailed map is an good example of Johnson's, and thus early American, cartography. Towns, roads, and other signs of progressing settlement are indicated. The clear presentation of cartographic information and the warm hand coloring make this an attractive as well as interesting historical document. $175



W.H. Gamble. "County Map of Michigan and Wisconsin." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1867. 11 1/2 x 13 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A third version of Mitchell's map of Michigan and Wisconsin (cf. above). This is an updated version of the W.H. Gamble rendering of 1863. Besides a change in the border style, the main change is that there is considerably more railroads shown in southern Michigan, showing the development of that state. $125



Milwaukee
"Plan of Milwaukee." From Mitchell's New General Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1875. 13 3/4 x 10 1/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Light waterstain in bottom margin. Very good condition.

S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., of Philadelphia, was one of the largest map publishers of the middle of the nineteenth century. The firm was founded by his father, who from around the middle of the nineteenth century issued atlases and maps of all parts of the world in all formats. The Mitchell atlases contained up-to-date maps which were as attractive as they were accurate. In this map, Milwaukee is detailed with its streets named, wards indicated in contrasting colors, and major buildings identified. With its bold hand-color, decorative borders, and interesting information, this is a fine example of the Mitchell firm's output. $175



Arbuckle Wisconsin
"Wisconsin." New York: Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, 1889. Ca. 3 x 5. Chromolithograph by Donaldson Brothers. Very good condition.

From a delightful series of maps issued by the Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company. This firm was founded by John and Charles Arbuckle of Pittsburgh, PA. They developed a machine to weigh, fill, seal and label coffee in paper packages, which allowed them to become the largest importer and seller of coffee in the world. Their most famous promotional program involved the issuing of several series of small, colorful trading cards, one of which was included in every package of Arbuckle's Coffee. These series included cards with sports, food, historic scenes, and--one of the most popular--maps. The latter cards included not only a map, but also small illustrations "which portrays the peculiarities of the industry, scenery, etc." of the region depicted. These cards are a delight, containing informative maps as well as wonderful scenes of the area mapped. $60



Maps by the George Cram firm of Chicago
Chicago: G.F. Cram & Co., Very good condition.

A detailed map of the city from the beginning of the twentieth century. The city with its streets, parks, railroad and trolley lines is shown clearly and precisely. The George Cram Company was an engraving and publishing firm from Chicago. In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of cartographic publishing was New York City, but in the 1880s this began to shift towards Chicago with the advent of the Rand, McNally and Cram firms. These firms were noted for their efficient output of precise maps filled with useful and up-to-date political and cultural information, and details on roads, towns, railroads and so forth.

George Cram started in the map and atlas business in 1867 as Cram & Blanchard. In 1869 the company became George F. Cram company, he was the sole owner. In 1921 George Cram retired and sold his business to the E.A. Peterson of the National Map Company. The Cram name was retained; in 1928 George Cram died. In 1932 the George F. Cram company produced globes for the first time. The company is still in business and producing globes today.



[Wisconsin]. From Rand McNally & Company's Indexed Atlas of the World. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1899. 26 x 19. Cerograph. Very good condition.

A late nineteenth century map from the early days of the Rand, McNally & Co. firm out of Chicago, a company that would shift the center of cartographic publishing from the east coast to the mid-west. Typical of the firm's work, this map has very good detail precisely and neatly exhibited. Topographic and social information, counties, roads, and many more details are neatly illustrated. Aesthetically and cartographically, it foreshadows the maps of the twentieth century. $90



"Wisconsin." From Atlas of the World. New York: C. S. Hammond, 1904. 11 x 8. Chromolithograph. Small tear in bottom margin. Otherwise, very good condition.

A detailed and up-to-date map by one of the leading American cartographic firms of the early twentieth century. New York had become the center of American map publishing in the middle of the nineteenth century. Towards the end of the century much of the cartographic industry moved to Chicago and other cities, but the Hammond firm kept New York as an important center of map-making. This map is typical of the company's output, with accurate and clearly presented topographical and geographical detail. $25



"Milwaukee." From Rand McNally & Company's Indexed Atlas of the World. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1909. 19 x 12 1/2. Cerograph. Very good condition.

A late nineteenth century map from the early days of the Rand, McNally & Co. firm out of Chicago, a company that would shift the center of cartographic publishing from the east coast to the mid-west. Typical of the firm's work, this map has very good detail precisely and neatly exhibited. Topographic and social information, counties, roads, and many more details are neatly illustrated. Aesthetically and cartographically, it foreshadows the maps of the twentieth century. $85




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