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Antique Maps of Russia

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Blaeu Moscovey
Isaac Massa. "Russiae volgo Moscovia dictae. Partes Septentrionalis et Orientalis. Auctore Isaaco Massa." Amsterdam: Joan Blaeu, 1642-43. 16 1/2 x 21 1/4. Engraving. Original hand color. Very good condition. Dutch on verso. Denver.

A nice example of Joan Blaeu's map of Moscovy, that is northern and eastern Russia. Considerable trade in Russia in the period came down the Dvina River from Archangel on the White Sea and this map shows all the small towns along that river. Other towns, rivers, lakes and other topography is indicated. Small vignettes of bears and elk populate the lands and two Russian inhabitants and fauna add decorative appeal to the cartouche for the scales of miles in the lower right. The title cartouche in the upper left, with pelts shown hanging from it, is flanked by a small cartouche with the imperial two-headed eagle. A nice map of the period. $525



Caspian Sea detail [Detail]
Thomas Woodroofe. "A Plain Chart of the Caspian Sea." London: J. Hanway, 1753. 13 3/4 x 21 1/2. Engraving. With folds as issued. Split at fold at right and one tear just into image; repaired. Some light off-setting. Very good condition.

The first detailed chart of the Caspian sea based on the surveys of John Elton and Thomas Woodroofe. They were both Englishmen who surveyed the sea in the early eighteenth century as part of the British trade in the area. $450



Jean Janvier. "Russie d'Europe avec la partie la plus peuplée de celle d'Asie." From Atlas Moderne. Paris: Jean Lattré & J. Thomas, 1762. 12 1/8 x 17 3/4. Engraving by Lattré. Original outline color. Very good condition.

Jean Janvier was a French cartographer who worked in Paris in the latter part of the eighteenth century. Among his output were some fine maps which appeared in Jean Lattré's Atlas Moderne. This atlas contained maps of all parts of the world engraved by Lattré, the "Graveur Ordinaire du Roi." Janvier's maps contained the best information available at the time, done with typical French precision and care. The map has a finely etched title cartouche, in the upper right corner. $275



John Cowley. "Russia or Muscovy in Europe." From A New and Easy Introduction to the Study of Geography. London, 1777. Engraving. Ca. 4 1/2 x 5 1/2. Very good condition.

A fine, small map of Russia from John Cowley, "Geographer to his Majesty." $75



Tobias Conrad Lotter. "Carte Géographique representant Le Théâtre de la Guerre entre Les Russes, Les Turcs, et les Polonois Confédérées, c'est a dire: D'Ukraine, de Nouvelle Servie, de Moldavie, Vachie, Krimée, Le Gouvernement de Woronez et d' Astracan, comme aussi la Tartarie de Kuban." Augsburg: T.C. Lotter, ca. 1778. Most likely from Atlas Géographique. 28 x 58. Large engraving on three joined sheets plus an additional folding smaller sheet (9 x 8) bottom left which extends to Constantinople. With folds and a couple printer's wrinkles. Map when unfolded is L shaped. Full, rich original hand color. With descriptive text of the wars in French. Very good condition.

A very large and detailed map showing the theatre of war during the Russo-Turkish Wars of the eighteenth-century. The Russo-Turkish wars were a series of wars fought between the Russian Empire and the Ottoman Empire between the 16th and 20th centuries. It was one of the longest conflicts in European history. This map chronicles the battles of the Russo-Austrian-Turkish War of 1736-39 and the Russo-Turkish War of 1768-1774 in the Crimean peninsula, southern Ukraine and parts of the Caucasus and Balkans near the Black Sea. In all of these wars, Russia's primary goal to was to expand its empire with an emphasis to gain access to the Black Sea and control of Polish territory.

The Russo-Austrian-Turkish War began due to Tartar and Crimean raids in the Ukraine and the Caucasus. Early in the war the Russians won a number of victories but were not able to hold the various territories it won due to disease and or lack of supplies. The Austrians entered the war, due to an alliance with Russia, but were defeated by the Ottomans in several battles. Even though the war is considered a draw, Russia succeeded by gaining control over several areas of southern Ukraine which brought Russia closer to the Crimean peninsula.

The Russo-Turkish war of 1768-1774 started much in the same way as the previous war due to a series of escalated border conflicts and crossings. It was in this war that the Russians achieved major land and naval victories which resulted in the total elimination of the Turkish Navy. Early in the war, Greece, Egypt and Syria rebelled against Ottoman rule. The peace treaty that followed gave Crimea its independence and allowed Russia two seaports on the Black Sea. Over time, Russian presence and control in the Crimea increased under the rule of Catherine the Great which eventually resulted with Russian annexation of the peninsula in 1783. $850



Cary: Russia in Europe
John Cary. "Russia in Europe." From Cary's New Universal Atlas. London: J. Cary, 1816. 9 x 11. Engraving. Original hand color. A few small spots in margins. Otherwise, excellent condition. Denver.

When the Napoleonic Wars ended, the victorious powers met to settle the borders of post-war Europe at the Congress of Vienna. The most notorious of their decisions was the final partition of Poland. In May 1815, Russia, Austria and Prussia signed the treaty dividing Poland among them. The lion’s share of the Duchy of Warsaw went to Russia. This map by Cary, issued the following year, reflects this division, with provinces identified and highlighted in contrasting shades of pastel hand color. A handsome and informative map with much detail. $175



Finley: Russia in Europe
Anthony Finley. From A New General Atlas. Philadelphia: A. Finley, 1824. 11 1/4 x 8 5/8. Engravings by Young & Delleker. Full original hand-color. Full margins. Very good condition unless noted otherwise.

Early in the nineteenth century, Anthony Finley was a great popularizer of maps out of Philadelphia and one of the leading cartographic publishers in America. His copper engraved maps are noted for their crisp appearance and interesting detail. These maps of Russia are typical of his work. Towns, rivers, and and other topographical features are noted. Also indicated, with contrasting shades, are the political divisions of the nation. The bright color make these maps as attractive as they are informative.



Russia in Europe
David H. Burr. "Russia in Europe." From A New Universal Atlas (1835). New York: Thomas Illman, 1834. 12 1/2 x 10 1/2. Engraving. Full original color. Very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of Russia east of the Ural Mountains by David H. Burr, one of the most important American cartographers of the first part of the nineteenth century. Having studied under Simeon DeWitt, Burr produced the second state atlas issued in the United States, of New York in 1829. He was then appointed to be geographer for the U.S. Post Office and later geographer to the House of Representatives. As a careful geographer, Burr is painstaking in this map to put in only information for which he felt there was a scientific basis. Burr's maps are scarce and quite desirable. $150



Asian Russia
John Lothian. "Russia in Asia." From New Edinburgh General Atlas. Edinburgh: J. Gellatly & London: Henry Washbourne, ca. 1840. 11 1/4 x 13 5/8. Engraving. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A lovely and well produced map from John Lothian's New Edinburgh General Atlas. Published jointly in London and Edinburgh, this atlas contained maps with very good detail of towns and cities, river and lakes, orography, and political divisions. In this period, the United Kingdom had established itself as the dominate economic and cartographic nation and the maps from this atlas bespeak the quality of British mapmakers. Each map is finely hand colored, making them as attractive as they are historically interesting. This is a nice map of Asian Russia, with rivers, mountains, lakes and political divisions indicated. $150



Mitchell: Russia in Asia
S. Augustus Mitchell. "Russia in Europe." From Mitchell's A New Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1849. 15 3/4 x 12 1/2. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Full original hand color. A few light spots. Otherwise, very good condition.

A fine map of Russia in Europe from the mid-nineteenth century. The map is filled with myriad details, including major rivers, cities, and provinces. It is a fine example of American cartography near mid-century and a fascinating and decorative historical artifact. $55



Maps by Charles Desilver Philadelphia: Charles Desilver, 1856. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition. With decorative border.

Charles Desilver, one of the many publishers working in Philadelphia during the mid-nineteenth century, issued an atlas of maps based on the famous Tanner-Mitchell-Cowperthwait series. Desilver used much the same information as originally drawn in the 1840s, but updated the maps with new roads, towns, and other information. These maps are typical of the rather unusual and scarce Desilver atlas. Attractive and fascinating documents of these countries.



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©The Philadelphia Print Shop, Ltd. Last updated November 3, 2014