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The Philadelphia Print Shop, Ltd.Historical Prints


Presidential Portraits
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Index: [ Presidential series | Group prints ]
[ A | B | C | F | G | H | J | L | M | P | R | T | V | W ]
[ Small Presidential portraits | Lincoln | Washington ]

Please note that though we try to keep these pages up to date, we may have other Presidential portraits not listed here.
Please contact us if you would like a current list of any President, and also visit our page of small portraits.



John Adams [1797-1801]

John Adams Alfred Newsam. "John Adams. 2nd. President of the United States." Philadelphia: C.W. Williams, 1846. Ca. 10 1/2 x 9. Lithograph by P.S. Duval. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A handsome portrait from a rare series of "Portraits of the Presidents." The publisher of this series was C.W. Williams, who used two of the most important figures in early American lithography, Alfred Newsam and P.S. Duval. Alfred Newsam, a deaf mute, began work as a lithographic artist almost two decades before working for Cephas G. Childs, a Philadelphia engraver and print publisher. Newsam was particularly noted for his portraits, including all the earliest images for the McKenney & Hall series of Indian portraits. In 1831, Childs formed a partnership with Henry Inman, at which time he went to Europe to learn more about lithography, which was still in its early stages. Childs came back with P.S. Duval, to help run the Childs & Inman presses. This was perhaps Childs' most significant contribution to American lithography, for Duval was to become one of the foremost lithographers in the country and the world. The quality of the work of both Newsam and Duval is evident in this fine portrait, which is finely drawn, lithographed, and colored. The image is surrounded by an elaborate border, indicating that Williams wanted his series to stand out from the plainer prints issued by his competitors. His strategy does not appear to have been very successful, as the scarcity of these images indicates not that many were sold. $525




John Quincy Adams [1825-1829]

JQ Adams Thomas Sully. "John Quincy Adams, President of the United States." Philadelphia: W.H. Morgan, Oct. 6, 1826. First state. 20 1/4 x 13 3/4. Engraving by Asher B. Durand. Some minor chipping at edges of good margins. Excellent condition. Conningham: p. 144f.; Stauffer II: 511i.

A nice example of the classic print of John Quincy Adams as President. Thomas Sully had been commissioned previously by Philadelphia publisher William H. Morgan to paint a portrait of James Madison for a series of Presidential engravings Morgan was publishing. When Adams was elected, Morgan went back to Sully to paint his image and Sully in turn arranged to hire Asher B. Durand to do the engraving. Durand, who had made a name for himself with his engraving of John Trumbull's Declaration of Independence, is generally considered to be the greatest American engraver of the time. Sully's image shows Adams sitting in his study with a large volume open on his knees. Book filled shelves appear in the back, another large folio leans against the chair, and a table is covered with other volumes and a packet of documents. Of particular interest are the two large partially unrolled maps, one of which shows the profile and topography of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, which Adams was involved with and which he attended the ground breaking of in 1828. This print, produced by two of America's leading artistic figures of the early nineteenth century, is the best of Adams during his Presidency and one of the best political portraits of the time. $1,800



John Quincy Adams Alfred Newsam. "John Q. Adams. 6th. President of the United States." Philadelphia: C.W. Williams, 1846. Ca. 10 1/2 x 9. Lithograph by P.S. Duval. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A handsome portrait from a rare series of "Portraits of the Presidents." The publisher of this series was C.W. Williams, who used two of the most important figures in early American lithography, Alfred Newsam and P.S. Duval. Alfred Newsam, a deaf mute, began work as a lithographic artist almost two decades before working for Cephas G. Childs, a Philadelphia engraver and print publisher. Newsam was particularly noted for his portraits, including all the earliest images for the McKenney & Hall series of Indian portraits. In 1831, Childs formed a partnership with Henry Inman, at which time he went to Europe to learn more about lithography, which was still in its early stages. Childs came back with P.S. Duval, to help run the Childs & Inman presses. This was perhaps Childs' most significant contribution to American lithography, for Duval was to become one of the foremost lithographers in the country and the world. The quality of the work of both Newsam and Duval is evident in this fine portrait, which is finely drawn, lithographed, and colored. The image is surrounded by an elaborate border, indicating that Williams wanted his series to stand out from the plainer prints issued by his competitors. His strategy does not appear to have been very successful, as the scarcity of these images indicates not that many were sold. $525



Arthur J. Stansbury. "John, Quincy, Adams. Sketch'd by Arthur J. Stansbury Esqr. A Few Hours Previous To The Death of Mr. Adams." New York, 1848. Lithograph by Sarony & Major. 10 1/4 x 14 1/8. Very good condition.

A most unusual memorial print, based on an 'on-the-spot' drawing done just before Adams died. This finely produced lithograph by Sarony & Major, with its sombre and patriotic border, would have been sold to a grieving public as news of the President's death was announced. $225



James Buchanan [1857-1861]

James Buchanan "James Buchanan." New York: J.C. Buttre, ca. 1857. 24 3/4 x 18 1/2. Engraving by J.C. Buttre. With considerable wear to margins, and some scattered stains in margins. Repaired tears into image, including one extending ca. 3" at top. Otherwise, impression is strong and image good.

John Chester Buttre (1821-1893) was one of the most prolific print makers of historical portraits and scenes in the early part of the second half of the nineteenth century. He was an engraver and publisher and his topics focused on figures such as George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. This print celebrates the 15th President, probably issued shortly after his election. Buchanan is shown standing in front of an elaborate chair with the U.S. crest on the back. The condition is rough, but the image itself is strong. $225




Grover Cleveland [1885-1889]

Grover Cleveland J. Keppler "from life." "Grover Cleveland." From Puck. New York: Keppler & Schwarzmann, 1886. Chromolithograph. 19 1/4 x 13 3/4. Some repaired tears and minor creases. Overall, very good condition. $125




Millard Fillmore [1850-1853]

None currently available.



James A. Garfield [1881]

"Genl. James Abram Garfield K.T. 14° A.&A. S.R Late President U.S.A." Chicago: Boyd Alexander Wadhams, 1882. Tinted lithograph by Kurz & Allison. 24 3/4 x 18 3/4. Very good condition.

A strong portrait of James Garfield issued after his death. The print is of particular interest for its Masonic themes. Garfield was a Mason, as was the publisher, Boyd A. Wadhams, and the image of Garfield on a stallion is filled with Masonic images. The print was lithographed by the Chicago firm of Kurz & Allison, that is well known for its production of commemorative prints using the latest technological advances. Founded in 1885, their avowed purpose was to design "for large scale establishments of all kinds, and in originating and placing on the market artistic and fancy prints of the most elaborate workmanship." This unusual and rare print is a nice example of their work and a fascinating historical document. $325


"J.A. Garfield and Family.". Chicago: Kurz & Allison, 1882. Large folio. Lithograph. Very good condition.

The Chicago firm of Kurz & Allison is well remembered for its production of commemorative prints using the latest technological advances. Founded in 1885, their avowed purpose was to design "for large scale establishments of all kinds, and in originating and placing on the market artistic and fancy prints of the most elaborate workmanship." Elaborate they certainly were, and they well represented the artistic taste of their period. Many of the prints from the firm were of the Civil War, but they included other important scenes of American history and a few portraits such as this print showing Garfield, as President, with his family. Drawn in a rigid style that follows from Kurz's background as a muralist, these prints have a simplicity that makes them not only interesting historical documents but also excellent large scale decorative images. $350




U.S. Grant [1869-1877]

U.S. Grant "U.S. Grant." No date, but probably ca. 1872. Two tone lithograph. 16 x 11. Very good condition.

An unusual, very "Presidential" portrait of Grant, perhaps issued during this campaign for a second term in 1872. Based on a photograph, this is a nice portrait of the President who is most often shown as a General. $150




Benjamin Harrison [1889-1893]

None currently available.



William Henry Harrison [1841]

"Death of Harrison, April 4 A.D. 1841." New York: N. Currier, 1841. Small folio. 8 1/2 x 12 7/8. Very good condition. C:1487.

An early Currier print, showing the death of Harrison and recording his last works, "I wish you to understand the true principles of the Government. I wish them carried out. I ask nothing more." $325


"William Henry Harrison. Ninth President of the United States." N. Currier, 1838-56. Small folio. 11 3/4 x 9 1/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Minor wear at edge of bottom margin. Gale: 7234. With six buttons visible on jacket. $325


William Henry Harrison "William Henry Harrison. Ninth President of the United States." N. Currier, 1838-56. Small folio. 11 3/4 x 9 1/4. Gale: 7235. Similar to above, but three buttons visible on jacket. $325




Herbert Hoover [1929-1933]

None currently available.



Andrew Jackson [1829-1837]

Currier: Death of Andrew Jackson "Death of Gen'l Andrew Jackson. President of the United States from 1829 to 1837." With side notes: "Born 15th. March 1767." and "Died 8th. June 1845." New York: N. Currier, 1845. Small folio. 8 1/4 x 12 1/2 (image) plus full margins. Lithograph. Original hand color. C: 1480. Very good condition. Professionally conserved and backed for strength.

A nice example of the type of popular historical prints issued by Nathaniel Currier. Old Hickory is shown in a mourning print done in the same year as his death. Not only Jackson's political allies would mourn, but also American Christians, because the dying man holds his Bible, and beneath the image is Jackson's reputed last words, "I am in the hands of a merciful god [sic.] I have full confidence in his goodness and mercy __ The Bible is true." A fine nineteenth century piece of art and history. $400



Andrew Jackson Alfred Newsam. "Andrew Jackson. 7th. President of the United States." Philadelphia: C.W. Williams, 1846. Ca. 10 1/2 x 9. Lithograph by P.S. Duval. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A handsome portrait from a rare series of "Portraits of the Presidents." The publisher of this series was C.W. Williams, who used two of the most important figures in early American lithography, Alfred Newsam and P.S. Duval. Alfred Newsam, a deaf mute, began work as a lithographic artist almost two decades before working for Cephas G. Childs, a Philadelphia engraver and print publisher. Newsam was particularly noted for his portraits, including all the earliest images for the McKenney & Hall series of Indian portraits. In 1831, Childs formed a partnership with Henry Inman, at which time he went to Europe to learn more about lithography, which was still in its early stages. Childs came back with P.S. Duval, to help run the Childs & Inman presses. This was perhaps Childs' most significant contribution to American lithography, for Duval was to become one of the foremost lithographers in the country and the world. The quality of the work of both Newsam and Duval is evident in this fine portrait, which is finely drawn, lithographed, and colored. The image is surrounded by an elaborate border, indicating that Williams wanted his series to stand out from the plainer prints issued by his competitors. His strategy does not appear to have been very successful, as the scarcity of these images indicates not that many were sold. $525



Thomas Sully. [Jackson.] Philadelphia: George W. Childs, 1852. 22 1/2 x 17 1/2. Engraving by Thomas B. Welch. Proof before letters. Wide margins. Very good condition.

Thomas Sully painted this likeness of Jackson in 1824, although he did not execute a completed oil on canvas until 1845. Sully had given a sketched copy of the portrait to Jackson, who in turn had given it to Francis Blair, and that is the source of this engraving. (See: James G. Barber's Andrew Jackson. A Portrait Study, Washington, 1991: 207-10). This handsome and sympathetic bust portrait is the head and shoulders for the full-length oil on canvas of Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans by Sully. It is also the basis for the portrait of Jackson on the twenty dollar bill today. The painting ended up in the collection of Francis Preston Blair and from that painting Welch made this rich engraving. A classic image of Jackson. This is a proof copy of this print, before title was added. $525


B.F. Smith after photograph by Paige. Bronze Statue of Genl. Andrew Jackson. Smith & Jenkins, 1853. From Dagtpe [sic-i.e. daguerreotype] by Paige. Dedicated to Clark Mills. Lithograph by B.F. Smith. Printed by F. Michelin. 19 x 11. Wide margins. Very good condition.

The famous statue of Andrew Jackson reviewing his troops on the evening of the Battle of New Orleans was erected on 7 January 1853 in Lafayette Park across from the White House in Washington, D.C. 8 January 1815 was the date of that battle, and the day after completion was an anniversary. Clark Mills (1810-1883) was a self taught sculptor who was recognized for his accomplishments when working in Charleston, S.C. Passing by an opportunity to study in Italy, he traveled to Richmond and Washington where he produced busts of famous men until he was commissioned to cast the huge equestrian of Jackson. The U.S. Army contributed captured British cannons from the War of 1812 to provide deeper meaning for it. Duplicate statues were soon ordered by the cities of New Orleans and Nashville. This beautiful lithograph was based on a daguerreotype by a photographer of uncertain identity. Blanchard P. Page in New York City in the early 1860s also spelled his name Paige in a city directory, but there was also a Cirus Page in New York in the 1850s and a Charles G. Page in Washington in 1856. $1,850



Andrew Jackson "Andrew Jackson." Philadelphia: William Smith, ca. 1865-76. Lithograph. 26 x 21 (full sheet). Excellent condition.

This half portrait most resembles the oil on canvas done by George P. A. Healy in 1845, just prior to Jackson's death. The later portraits have been designated as those of the "elder statesman" or the "sage of the Hermitage," but the scrappy old gentleman based on photographs is softened in Healy's work as this one followed that pattern. Like Healy's portrait, this shows his high mane of hair parted down the middle and more controlled. From the end of the Civil War and up to the 1876 Centennial, Andrew Jackson was celebrated as a staunch supporter of the Union, and this print would have had appeal for many Americans. Being from Tennessee and a hero in New Orleans as well as elsewhere, he would have represented a former president who was respected in both North and South. $375




Thomas Jefferson [1801-1809]

"Thomas Jefferson. Third President of the United States." New York: N. Currier, 1838-56. Small folio. 11 1/4 x 8 7/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. C:6026. Wide margins.

From 1834 to 1907 the firm of Nathaniel Currier and (after 1856) Currier & Ives provided for the American people a wide and varied gallery of prints for the new mass market of middle class society. The firm produced two general types of prints: "rush" prints quickly made to provide information about newsworthy events, and "stock" prints depicting every conceivable subject relating to American life, including city views, sports, games, home life, religion, and entertainment. These prints were issued as small folio prints that sold for about 20 cents each, to large, more finely produced prints which sold for between $1 and $3. The firm was the most successful American popular printmaker, issuing over 8,000 different prints. Their success was the result of their good business sense and their accurate instincts of what the American public wanted. Their images have become classics, capturing the life and times of nineteenth century America. $650



Andrew Johnson [1865-1869]

Andrew Johnson P. Kramer. "Andrew Johnson." Philadelphia (?), ca. 1855. Lithograph. Ca. 12 x 10. Wide margins. Very good condition.

An unusual image of the seventeenth President, Andrew Johnson. This lithograph is signed in the image "P. Kramer." This is likely Peter Kramer, a painter and lithographer from Bavaria, who emigrated to the United States in 1848. He worked for P.S. Duval, a Philadelphia lithographic publisher, until 1857, and returned to Germany in 1858. He was later exiled for caricaturing the King of Bavaria and returned to America until he died in 1907. This is a handsome portrait and a fine example of lithographic printmaking in the middle of the nineteenth century. $275



Sartain's Johnson Andrew Johnson. Philadelphia: [Wm. Sartain, 1865]. William Smith, ca. 1880. 18 1/2 x 14. Mezzotint by William Sartain. Wide margins. Strong impression. Very good condition.

A handsome portrait of Andrew Johnson, produced in the mezzotint process by William Sartain. Sartain, along with his father John, was the foremost American practitioner of this elaborate printmaking process for the production of historical prints. His prints always have a strong and rich texture that enhances their aesthetic qualities considerably, and the images are always historically quite accurate. This combination makes prints by William Sartain most desirable, and this example is no exception. $450




Abraham Lincoln [1861-1865]

GoGo to page of portraits of Abraham Lincoln



James Madison [1809-1817]

None currently available.


William McKinley [1897-1901]

None currently available.



James Monroe [1817-1825]

James Monroe Alfred Newsam. "James Monroe. 5th. President of the United States." Philadelphia: C.W. Williams, 1846. Ca. 10 1/2 x 9. Lithograph by P.S. Duval. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A handsome portrait from a rare series of "Portraits of the Presidents." The publisher of this series was C.W. Williams, who used two of the most important figures in early American lithography, Alfred Newsam and P.S. Duval. Alfred Newsam, a deaf mute, began work as a lithographic artist almost two decades before working for Cephas G. Childs, a Philadelphia engraver and print publisher. Newsam was particularly noted for his portraits, including all the earliest images for the McKenney & Hall series of Indian portraits. In 1831, Childs formed a partnership with Henry Inman, at which time he went to Europe to learn more about lithography, which was still in its early stages. Childs came back with P.S. Duval, to help run the Childs & Inman presses. This was perhaps Childs' most significant contribution to American lithography, for Duval was to become one of the foremost lithographers in the country and the world. The quality of the work of both Newsam and Duval is evident in this fine portrait, which is finely drawn, lithographed, and colored. The image is surrounded by an elaborate border, indicating that Williams wanted his series to stand out from the plainer prints issued by his competitors. His strategy does not appear to have been very successful, as the scarcity of these images indicates not that many were sold. $525





Franklin Pierce [1853-1857]

Pierce "Genl. Franklin Pierce. Fourteenth President of the United States." New York: N. Currier, 1852-56. Lithograph. Original hand color. 11 1/2 x 8 5/8. Narrow margins, chip in top left corner and trimmed just into bottom of second line of title. Otherwise, very good condition. C:2253.

From the Currier Presidents series. $250




James K. Polk [1845-1849]

"James K. Polk. Eleventh President of the United States." N. Currier, 1838-56. Small folio. 11 1/2 x 8 5/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. C:3163. $350



Theodore Roosevelt [1901-1909]

Teddy Roosevelt "Col. Theodore Roosevelt U.S.V." Chicago: Kurz & Allison, ca. 1898. Uncolored lithograph. 23 1/2 x 18. Very good condition.

A rare and dramatic print of Roosevelt after he had joined the volunteer corps during the Spanish American War. Much of his reputation as a strong and valiant leader came from his reported exploits in Cuba. Here is a classic image issued during the war by the Chicago firm of Kurz & Allison. $1,200




Zachary Taylor [1849-1850]

None currently available.


John Tyler [1841-1845]

John Tyler J.R. Lambdin. “John Tyler. President of the United States.” Philadelphia: William Smith, ca. 1880. Mezzotint by John Sartain. 20 1/2 x 14 3/8. Strong impression. Wide margins. Very good condition.

A handsome portrait of John Tyler produced by the mezzotint process by John Sartain (1808-1897). Sartain, known as the “father of mezzotint engraving” in the U.S. popularized this elaborate printmaking process when he emigrated to this country from England in 1830. His prints always have a strong and rich texture that enhances their aesthetic qualities considerably, and the images are always historically accurate. This combination makes prints by Sartain most desirable, and this example is no exception. It is a fine example of American historical portraiture. $450




Martin Van Buren [1837-1841]

Endicott Van Buren "Martin Van Buren. 8th President of the United States." New York: G. Endicott, ca. 1837. 13 1/4 x 10 1/2. Lithograph. Very good condition. Framed.

The first series of popular prints of the Presidents was published by Pendleton lithography in 1828. This inspired a number of other similar series, including those by Currier & Ives. The earliest series to follow the Pendleton prints was a set done by George Endicott in New York City about 1834. These prints were lithographed by W. Ball, and not only are they are generally higher quality than most other popular Presidential series, but Endicott expanded the original five prints to extend as late as Martin Van Buren, the eighth President. This is a fine example of this rare series. $325



Inman/Sartain: van Buren Henry Inman. “Martin Van Buren, President of the United States.” Philadelphia: W.H. Morgan & Son, ca. 1839. Mezzotint by John Sartain. 20 3/8 x 14. Strong impression. Very good condition.

A handsome, full length portrait of Martin Van Buren (1782-1862), eighth president of the United States (1837-41), the first to be born in the United States. This print was produced by John Sartain (1808-1897), known as the “father of mezzotint engraving” in the U.S. popularized this elaborate printmaking process when he emigrated to this country from England in 1830. His prints always have a strong and rich texture that enhances their aesthetic qualities considerably, and the images are always historically accurate. This combination makes prints by Sartain most desirable, and this example is no exception. It is a fine example of American historical portraiture and one of Sartain’s most famous engravings. It is interesting to note that the plate for this print was later used to produce a print of Abraham Lincoln, whose head replaced that of Van Buren! The print was based on an 1839 painting by noted portrait artist Henry Inman. $1,100



Van Buren Charles Fenderich. "Martin Van Buren, President of the United States." Washington: C. Fenderich, 1839. Ca. 11 1/2 x 11. Lithograph by P.S. Duval. Very good condition.

A beautifully wrought portrait of Martin Van Buren painted in Washington during his Presidency. Charles Fenderich was a Swiss lithographer who had emigrated to Philadelphia in 1831. In Philadelphia, Fenderich issued a number of lithographs jointly with fellow Swiss artist J.C. Wild and also on his own until about 1837, at which time he moved to Washington, D.C. There Fenderich, realizing the opportunities afforded in the nation's capital, began to issue a series of fine lithographic portraits of American statesmen. These fine portraits were primarily based on his own life-drawings, for as his reputation spread, most of the political figures in Washington were delighted to sit for him. In all Fenderich made about 84 portraits in Washington between 1837 and 1848, after which he joined the California Gold Rush, to finish his days at an artist on the west coast. Fenderich's portraits are not only beautifully made, but they provide us with excellent life-portraits of most of the important American statesmen of the third and fourth decades of the nineteenth century. $750



Martin Van Buren “Martin Van Buren.” Hartford: D.W. Kellogg. Vignette, ca. 9 x 9. Lithograph. Original hand color. Repaired tear in bottom right, well away from image. Otherwise very good condition.

An lithograph of Martin Van Buren, by the D.W. Kellogg firm of Hartford. This print is typical of the type of Presidential portraits which would have hung in many middle-class American homes during the middle of the nineteenth century. $175




George Washington [1789-1797]

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