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Antique Maps of Philadelphia & Environs

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Gent Mag: Scull and Heap
Nicholas Scull & George Heap. "A Map of Philadelphia and Parts Adjacent." London: Gentleman's Magazine, February 1777. Second edition. 13 1/2 x 11 1/2. Engraving. Folds as issued. Short repaired tear at bottom. Minor crease in upper left hand corner of map. Else, very good condition. Prints of Philadelphia, 10; Snyder: 16A.

Perhaps the most famous map of Philadelphia, the Scull & Heap map went through many editions beginning in 1752. Originally the map was issued as a promotion piece for Penn's city and province in America, and with that purpose in mind a reduced version was issued in 1753 in the London periodical Gentleman's Magazine. Just over two decades later, Philadelphia became the political center of the turmoil surrounding the American War of Independence, and together with the British occupation, these circumstances created renewed interest in the City of Brotherly Love. The Scull & Heap map was still the best available of Philadelphia, so the publishers of Gentleman's Magazine reissued the map in a slightly updated form in December, 1777.

Holme's grid plan for Philadelphia itself lies at the center of the map, with the open Center Square and the Court House the only indicated features. More information is given of the surrounding regions, where roads, mills, and houses of prominent citizens are shown and named. Of some note is interesting depiction of Germantown, with houses lining both sides of Germantown Pike. As the settlements in New Jersey to the east of Philadelphia had considerably developed over the previous two decades, this version of the map added roads and settlement information there. As the events of 1777 and 1778 unfolded, this widely disseminated map would have provided most of the English public with their only view on the geography of the city, and likewise it provides us with a unique view of the city over two centuries ago. It is a classic piece of Philadelphiana from the Revolutionary War period. $1,200



DesBarres: Pennsylvania
Joseph Frederick Wallet DesBarres. "Pennsylvania" [Delaware River from Wilmington to the Trenton area]. London: The Admiralty, 1777. Prepared for The Atlantic Neptune. Etching. 30 1/2 x 41. Colored with a light wash. Former folds reinforced; backed on archival paper. Sellers & Van Ee, 1323.

After the French & Indian War, the British began the project of mapping their vast, newly acquired lands in North America. The job of coordinating and publishing the surveys fell upon J.F.W. DesBarres, who had commanded the mapping of the coasts of eastern Canada. The resulting atlas, The Atlantic Neptune, was called by A.P. Loring "the first great marine atlas of the eastern seaboard," and Loring quotes Obadiah Rich, who called it "the most splendid collection of charts, plans and views ever published." This is a chart of the upper Delaware River from Wilmington to as far as a ship could safely float, i.e. to Trenton. Information is fairly sparse on the map because the designer was very selective about what to include. An occasional church or meeting house is shown and a few primitive town plans are depicted. Conventional symbols for swamps and waterways are shown for as much as ten miles inland. All copies of this map are characterized by a paucity of information, yet this chart would still serve to guide a ship up this narrow river. The map reflects the best British knowledge of the entrance to Philadelphia at the time of the war. $6,750



Le Rouge: Delaware Bay
Joshua Fisher. "Baye De La Delaware." Paris: George Louis le Rouge, 1778. First state. 18 1/4 x 25. Engraving. Full margins. Strong strike on heavy paper. Excellent condition. Snyder: 265e.

The first chart of the Delaware Bay was made in 1756 by Joshua Fisher, a former hatter from Lewes. It showed the lower part of the bay and was intended to be used as a navigational aid for ships sailing toward Philadelphia. In 1775, Fisher produced an expanded chart that showed the bay and the Delaware River to just beyond Philadelphia. This was the most important map of the bay and river in the eighteenth century, and it went through many different versions, of which this is the first French version. In 1778, the French were allied with the Americans against the British, and much of their assistance took the form of naval support. Therefore it is not surprising that the French would issue their own version of the best available chart of the approaches to Philadelphia. The map is oriented to the west so that Philadelphia lies at the far right, and Cape Henlopen at the far left. Navigational information is copious in the bay, and the main shipping lane is indicated to Philadelphia, with depths indicated along it. A list of Pilots and Masters of Vessels attesting to the accuracy of the chart in included. Reflecting its source, most names appear in English, though Le Rouge has added a number of French translations. A superior chart of the approaches to Philadelphia at the beginning of the American Revolution. $2,600



Drayton: Philadelphia 1824
"Plan of the City of Philadelphia . . . by J[oseph]. Drayton." Philadelphia: Carey & Lea, 1824. Engraving by J. H. Young. 14 1/2 x 17 (neat lines). Hand color to outline districts.

A precisely engraved map of the City of Philadelphia issued by the associates who printed the Carey & Lea atlases. An abundance of detail is clear and provides much fascinating information about Philadelphia at the beginning of the second quarter of the nineteenth century. Streets, both existing and planned are shown, and buildings are indicated. The developed parts of the city are indicated with shading, and proposed streets are noted by dotted lines. The Eastern States Penitentiary, not finished until 1829, is shown and the layouts of Independence Park, and Franklin and Washington Squares are detailed. The new Fairmount Waterworks is displayed along the "Manaiunk or Schuylkill River," and the Centre Square Waterworks building is also shown. The map was designed for folding into a guide book for serious business plans of government and commerce. A fine work by Joseph Drayton who became the official artist for the Wilkes Expedition in the late 1830s. $1,800



Barnes: Philadelphia 1867
R. L. Barnes. "Barnes' Driving Map of Philadelphia and Surroundings. From Surveys and Records by H. E. B. Taylor." Philadelphia: R.L. Barnes, 1867. 27 1/2 x 31 1/2. Separately issued lithograph. Decorative border as issued. Separated into 32 sections, hand colored and mounted on linen by Sheble, Smith & Co. ("successors to R.L. Barnes").

A wonderfully colored and very decorative map of Philadelphia and the surrounding areas. Major buildings, homes, streets and railroad lines are clearly and precisely delineated. What makes this map unusual and such a valuable document is the extent to which surrounding areas are rendered with the same detail and care as the center of the city. Many long-gone community names are illustrated, both within the city and in neighboring Pennsylvania counties and New Jersey. A beautiful map that gives us as well a wealth of information about the way Philadelphia looked in the middle of the nineteenth century. $600



John Reed. "To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Philadelphia With the Catalogue of Purchass is Humbly Dedicated by their most Obedient Humble Servant John Reed." Philadelphia: Charles L. Warner, [1774]-1870. Facsimile edition. Separately issued map, dissected into 20 sections and mounted onto linen for folding. 29 1/2 x 58 1/2. Lithograph by Worley & Bracher. Printed by Fred Bourquin. Very good condition. Snyder: 41b.

In 1774 John Reed published his detailed map of Philadelphia and its surrounding "Liberties" to confront the powers of the Penn family which he claimed had neglected the original grants of land to his family. Reed issued the map to illustrate a small book which he published to forward his claim, and as such it included detailed information about the land grants in the liberties. The resulting huge map was engraved on three plates by James Smither. The suit failed to gain him any land, but Reed did provide us with a remarkable document. The map shows information on the actual lay-out of the city at the time, and of the grants in the liberties, details not shown well on other maps of the period which tended to be more schematic, following Holme's projected grid plan. Reed's large, separately issued map is extremely rare, but fortunately there are a number of full size facsimiles, including this excellent lithograph issued in 1870. It provides us with a precious and detailed look at Philadelphia just before the American Revolution. $1,100



Mitchell: Philadelphia 1873
S. Augustus Mitchell Jr. "Plan of Philadelphia." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell Jr. 1873. 11 x 12 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Full margins. Decorative border.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases. The map depicts and names streets, rail lines, and major buildings. Each ward is colored in a contrasting pastel shade. This map was republished in several editions and it provided more readers with information about Philadelphia than any other map of the period. A fine decorative border surrounds the map; an attractive mid-nineteenth century map. $250



"Smith's New Map of Philadelphia and Vicinity." Philadelphia: J.L. Smith, 1875. Lithograph. Two part, separately issued folding map, with original gold stamped buckram front cover. Each part ca. 13 x 21. Wear and some small tears along folds. Some tape on reverse. Small stains. Else, very good condition.

A large map of Philadelphia and the regions to the north as far as North Wales, to the east as far as Moorestown, and to the west just beyond Downingtown. Major streets and some buildings are shown in the city, including the site of the Centennial celebration. Extensive information is given for the surrounding area, including roads, rivers, rail lines, mills, hotels, meeting houses, and myriad other geographic details,. Interestingly, the map errs by including Montgomery County's Cheltenham Township within the Philadelphia County line. $450



G[riffith] M[organ] Hopkins. Atlas of Philadelphia and environs: from official records, private plans, and actual surveys based upon plans deposited in the Department of Surveys surveyed & published under the direction of G.M. Hopkins, C.E., 320 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, 1877. F. Bourquin Steam Lithographic Press, 31 South 6th Street, Philadelphia. Folio. Worn boards and spine; front hinge broken. Interior clean and complete (pp. 1-25, 28, 33-87; 50 colored maps). Includes historical sketch of Montgomery County. Moak, Atlases of Pennsylvania: 407.

Areas covered in this atlas:



Smith: Philadelphia 1882
"Smith's Map of Philadelphia." Separately issued, folding map. Philadelphia: J.L. Smith, 1882. 20 5/8 x 23 3/4. Lithograph. Original printed color. Folding into original cloth cover. Excellent condition.

An interesting map of Philadelphia as it appeared shortly after the Centennial, highlighting ward divisions as they appeared between 1875 and 1888. The map delineates the city from Oregon Avenue on the south to the lower corner of Hunting Park on the north, up the Delaware River past Petty's Island to Port Richmond, and from the tip of Manayunk on the northwest down through Hestonville, Haddington and Angora to just south of Mt. Moriah Cemetery. Philadelphia – and Camden – wards are indicated both by color-coding and by numbering; the 26th ward (West Passyunk) is shown, but its number was not printed. Of great interest are the rail lines, grain elevators, cemeteries, hospitals and other institutions, as well as long-ago neighborhood names such as "Coopersville" and "Franklinville," both in the vicinity of 2nd Street and Erie Avenue. Altogether a wonderful depiction of the city in this time period. $450



"New Map of Philadelphia and Vicinity." Philadelphia: J.L. Smith, 1891. Separately issued, folding map in two sheets. Each sheet ca 26 x 22. Lithograph. Original color highlights. Separated at some folds. Browned but clean. Folding into original cloth cover.

Smith's large, two-sheet folding map of Philadelphia and environs. It covers the area from Philadelphia to the north as far as North Wales, to the east as far as Moorestown, and to the west just beyond Downingtown. Major streets and some buildings are shown in the city. Extensive information is given for the surrounding area, including roads, rivers, rail lines, mills, hotels, meeting houses, and myriad other geographic details. $225



"Philadelphia." From Indexed Atlas Of The World. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., [1898]-1899. 19 x 26. Cerograph. Full original color. Very good condition.

A late nineteenth century map from the early days of the Rand, McNally & Co. firm out of Chicago, a company that would shift the center of cartographic publishing from the east coast to the mid-west. Typical of the work from the firm, this map has very good detail, precisely and neatly exhibited. One inset shows some of the Pennsylvania and New Jersey railroad stations/communities around Philadelphia, and another lists the Delaware River piers' railroad connections, keyed to the pier numbers. Aesthetically and cartographically a foreshadow of the maps of the twentieth century. $225


"New Map of Philadelphia and Vicinity." Philadelphia: J.L. Smith, 1907. 26 1/4 x 42 3/4 (neat lines) plus borders. Separately issued, folding map backed on linen folded into 12 91/2 x 11 sections. Lithograph. Clean but some sections separated.

A large folding map of Philadelphia and the regions to the north as far as Trappe and North Wales, to the east as far as Andalusia on the Delaware River, to the west just beyond Downingtown and Kennett Square, and to the south to the Delaware River and Deptford, New Jersey. Major streets and some buildings are shown in the city. Extensive information is given for the surrounding area, including roads, rivers, rail lines, mills, hotels, meeting houses, and myriad other geographic details. A useful historical map. $275



"Noll's New Indexed Guide Map of Philadelphia and Camden, N.J." Philadelphia: E. P. Noll & Co., 1914. Two part, separately issued map with original cover. Each part ca. 28 x 40. Cerograph, original outline hand color. Some separations at folds, but overall very good.

A large, detailed and very attractive early twentieth century map of Philadelphia and neighboring Camden (N.J.). E.P. Noll & Co. ("Map Publishers & Manufacturers"), located on North Sixth Street, was the leading Philadelphia cartographic firm of the period, issuing maps for bicyclists, motorists, and other travelers. This map contains superb detail of streets (even some of which were never created), along with street indexes for the two cities. Also shown are parks, cemeteries, some hospitals and educational institutions, and the like. Well designed, with up-to-date information. $475



Elvino V. Smith. "Map of Philadelphia, Camden and Vicinity . . . by Elvino V. Smith, 512-514 Walnut Street." Credit reads, "Engraved by Albert Volk, Philadelphia." Philadelphia: E.V. Smith, 1921. 55 x 43 1/2. Chromolithograph. Full margins. Backed on linen and joined into 48 rectangles. Some wear along folds as issued. Separately issued. Very good condition.

A very large map of Philadelphia and the regions to the northwest as far as Ambler and Ft. Washington, to the northeast as far as Somerton, to the southwest just beyond Norwood in Delaware County, and to the southeast to Clementon, New Jersey. Major streets are shown in the city and suburbs. Elvino Victor Smith is listed in various atlas directories such as those by LeGear and Moak as flourishing from 1905-31. $650



Interstate Map Company. The "Red Book" Information and Street Guide to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. New York, 1926. 6 x 3. 208 pages, plus folded Philadelphia, PA, & Camden, NJ, street map which opens to 19 x 32.

Along with the indexed map, this small paperback guide book contains information on: streets and house numbers; armories; aviation clubs and fields; banks and trust companies; charities; churches; clubs; courts; consulates; ferries; fire and police stations; hotels; hospitals; cemeteries; libraries; newspapers; high schools; steamship companies; theatres; office buildings; parks; rail, trolley and bus lines; post offices and other points of interest. Altogether this is an excellent snapshot of a time just before the Great Depression in what was then the third-largest city in the United States. $225



Joseph P. Sims. "Historical Map of Chestnut Hill, Penna." 1929+. Later coloring. 17 x 21. Framed.

Joseph Patterson Sims (1890-1953) was a Philadelphia architect, author and lithographer. Son of John Clark Sims (1845-1901), lawyer and Secretary of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and Grace L. Patterson Sims (1847-1927), when Sims was born the family lived in the house his father built in Cheltenham Township's Laverock section, "Falcon Hill." After the elder Sims' death Mrs. Sims and her family moved to 319 East Gravers Lane in Philadelphia's Chestnut Hill section, which they called "Gracehill," and in which Sims would live and raise his own family.

According to the Philadelphia Architects and Buildings Project, Sims received his early education at the Chateau deLancey in Geneva, Switzerland, at St. Paul's School in New Hampshire, and at Chestnut Hill Academy. He received his B.S. in Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania in 1912, working first for Arnold Morse, then at the Furness, Evans & Co. office, and eventually forming his own firm, Willing, Sims & Talbutt. The firm was successful in the design of residences, especially in the then-popular Norman farmhouse style, although Sims himself was interested in colonial revival styles, including the Pennsylvania farmhouse type which was practiced in the suburbs of Philadelphia. After World War I Sims pursued his hobbies of lithography and map-making with great success, producing a number of handsome family tree presentations illustrated with precise elevations of colonial Philadelphia sites. He also wrote and illustrated several articles and monographs regarding Philadelphia architectural and family history.

This map, an example of his hobby, names the original sections of the German Township - Cresheim, Sommerhausen and Crefeld - the latter two of which compose Chestnut Hill, and is embellished with the "Arms of Penn" (William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania) and "Arms of Pastorius" (Francis Daniel Pastorius, founder of Germantown). In addition to Chestnut Hill itself, portions of Springfield Township are shown. The map indicates "Roads in Use Before 1800," but in addition to historical street names shows their contemporary ones as well. The 19th century Pennsylvania and Reading Railroad lines are delineated. At the bottom is a brief description of Penn's treaty with the local Indians, as well as illustrated insets labeled "Indians," Mills," Printing," "Revolutionary," "Stage Coaches" and "Inns." To each side is a list of forty-four locations numbered on the map where important buildings, inns, churches, birthplaces of prominent personages, and the like, are shown, with special indication of which buildings still existed in 1929.

Altogether a very attractive example of the artist's skill, historical interest and affection for his home neighborhood. $650



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