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Maps of Pennsylvania to 1850

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William Scull. "A Map of Pennsylvania..." London: Sayer & Bennett, 1775. 26 3/4 x 53 1/2. Engraving. Original outline color. Tear into top margin 4 1/2" into image. Numerous short tears into right margin. Small spots in center near "Allegany Ridge" with a similar 2" stain near title. All tears expertly repaired. Strong strike with paper textures varying on original sections. Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers, p. 53; Hansen, Pennsylvania Prints, Item 2.

A strong, attractive example of William Scull's seminal map of Pennsylvania, a map oft referred to as the 'Revolutionary War map' of the state. The information depicted on the map is far and away the most comprehensive and accurate for any map of Pennsylvania to that date, and for years thereafter; a fact that in part reflects its history. In 1759, Nicolas Scull, the Surveyor General of Pennsylvania and William Scull's grandfather, issued a map of the eastern parts of Pennsylvania commissioned by the colony's government. This was based to a great extent upon Nicolas' surveys and other first hand information, making it the standard for all subsequent maps. About ten years later, William Scull produced an updated map of Pennsylvania, basing it upon his grandfather's map as well as on his own new surveys and other information. The first edition of this map, issued in small numbers, is extremely scarce and valuable. Five years later, Sayer and Bennett issued this further updated edition in Jefferys' North American Atlas of 1775. $5,200



William Scull. "A Map of Pennsylvania." Paris: George Louis le Rouge, 1778. 26 1/2 x 51 3/4 (platemarks) plus generous margins all around. Engraving. Folds as issued. With some minor folds and short tears and very few spots along borders. Overall excellent condition.

A French edition of William Scull's seminal map of Pennsylvania, a map oft referred to as the 'Revolutionary War map' of the state. The information depicted on the map is far and away the most comprehensive and accurate for any map of Pennsylvania at the time of the Revolution. In 1759, Nicolas Scull, the Surveyor General of Pennsylvania and William Scull's grandfather, issued a map of the eastern parts of Pennsylvania commissioned by the colony's government. This was based to a great extent upon Nicolas' surveys and other first hand information, making it the standard for all subsequent maps. About ten years later, William Scull produced his updated map of the colony, basing it upon his grandfather's map as well as on his own new surveys and other information.

Because of its detail and accuracy, this map would have been used by the British, American and French troops during the Revolution. This international interest in the map is reflected in the issuing of this French edition which copies exactly Scull's information. The only obvious difference between the English and French editions is the addition of a French language imprint in the upper left corner. A wealth of detail is shown, especially for the region around Philadelphia, where roads, houses, tolls, inns, mills, etc. are indicated and named. One of the most significant features of William Scull's map is that it is the first to show with any accuracy the western portions of the colony. The frontier west of the mountain ridges that cut through Pennsylvania were just beginning their social and economic development around the middle of the eighteenth century, and so it was crucial for this area to be accurately mapped. William Scull was the first to go beyond the 'improved' parts of the colony to show the topography, settlements, forts, and roads of the region. Shown, for example, were the main roads to and through the west, including the "Forbes Road," the major highway from the east to the Mississippi Valley, the main forts in the area, including Fort Pitt, now Pittsburgh, and some of the early battle sites, such as "Gen'l Braddock's Field." For the whole state, then, this map is a trove of fascinating social and topographical detail; it is one of the most interesting and significant maps of Pennsylvania ever produced. $3,500



Matthew Carey. "Pennsylvania." from Carey's American Pocket Atlas. Philadelphia: M. Carey, 1801. Engraving. With margins and folds as issued. Very good condition.

A map from the second edition of Carey's American Pocket Atlas, published in 1801. This is a significant, early atlas issued by Mathew Carey, the first American to specialize in cartographic publishing. Carey, an Irish immigrant, set up an elaborate cottage system of craftsmen for engraving, printing, and coloring his maps, utilizing the best independent artists directed to a common end. Carey is important, then, not only for the excellent maps he produced, but for his setting the pattern for American map publishing, to be followed by the likes of John Melish and Henry S. Tanner.

The Pocket Atlas contained 19 small folding maps of the different states and territories in the United States. Carey's maps contain the most accurate and detailed information on the country and he updated his maps for each edition of his atlas. $275



Samuel Lewis. "Pennsylvania." From A New and Elegant General Atlas by Aaron Arrowsmith and Samuel Lewis. Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Petersburg and Norfolk: Samuel Lewis, 1804. 8 x 9 5/8. Engraving by D. Fairman. Outline color. Very good condition.

An excellent map from an early American atlas. The maps were the works of Aaron Arrowsmith, one of the foremost cartographers of his era, and Samuel Lewis, one of the leaders in the nascent American cartographic field. This map of Pennsylvania is a fine example of Lewis' output. Detail of the settlement in the state, along with topographical information is neatly portrayed. Roads and counties are also shown. A fine example of some of the best American cartography of the period. $175



Carey Pennsylvania
Mathew Carey. "Pennsylvania." Philadelphia: M. Carey & son, 1814. 11 1/2 x 18 1/4. Engraving. Original outline color. Very good condition.

An important map of Pennsylvania by Mathew Carey, one of the seminal figures in early American Cartography. Published during the War of 1812, this map is from Carey's Atlas which represented the best American cartographic work of the period. Carey, an Irish immigrant, established the first American specialized cartographic publishing firm. He set up an elaborate cottage system of craftsmen for engraving, printing, and coloring his maps utilizing the best independent artists directed to a common end. Carey is important, then, not only for the excellent maps he produced, but for his setting the pattern for American map publishing, to be followed by the likes of John Melish and Henry S. Tanner. This map of Pennsylvania, Carey's home state, is a fine example of his work. Topographical information is neatly portrayed, including towns, rivers, mountains, and roads. The counties are named and indicated by light pastel coloring. Longitude is given both with a prime meridian at London and at Philadelphia. $825



Lucas: Pennsylvania
Fielding Lucas Jr. "Pennsylvania." From A New and Elegant General Atlas Containing Maps of each of the United States. Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1816. Folio. Engravings. Full original hand color. Large margins. Fine condition.

A fine map by Baltimore cartographer, Fielding Lucas, Jr. (1781-1854). Lucas appears to have become involved in the publishing and book trade while a resident of Philadelphia from 1798 to 1804, when he moved to Baltimore. In 1807 Lucas joined Conrad, Lucas & Co., and then in 1810 he set up his own business at 138 Market Street. There Lucas first got involved in cartographic publishing with his New and Elegant General Atlas of 1816. In the second decade of the nineteenth century, through his Philadelphia contacts, Lucas was one of the major contributors to Carey & Lea's atlas of 1823. Concurrently with this involvement, Lucas brought out his own General Atlas, containing 104 maps of all parts of the world. Lucas, during his 50 years of residence in Baltimore, established himself as a prominent citizen of that city, serving as President of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, President of the Board of School Commissioners, and as President of the Second Branch of the City Council. But it is for his important role in early American cartography that Lucas is best remembered. $325



Carey and Lea Pennsylvania
"Pennsylvania." From A Complete Historical, Chronological, and Geographical American Atlas. Philadelphia: H.C. Carey & I. Lea, 1822-1825. 12 x 17 3/4 (map); 16 3/4 x 20 1/2 (full sheet). Very good condition.

In 1822, Henry Charles Carey and Isaac Lea published their American Atlas. This volume was based on Emmanuel Las Cases' Atlas Historique of 1803, with updated maps and text modified by Carey, a political economist. The sheets from this atlas are comprised of an engraved map surrounded by text documenting the history, climate, population and so forth of the area depicted. This map of Pennsylvania shows excellent and very up-to-date detail, with the river systems particularly well mapped, and the development of the state is graphically illustrated, with towns and roads depicted throughout the state. $575



Henry S. Tanner. "Map of Pennsylvania and New Jersey." From New American Atlas. Philadelphia: H.S. Tanner, 1823. 20 1/2 x 27. Engraving by "H.S. Tanner & Assistants." Full original color. Slight separation and foldover at centerfold. Non-acidic mending tape on verso. Else good condition.

An impressive and important American map of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. From Tanner's seminal American Atlas, which was a monument in the early history of American cartography. Its format and size and detail made it probably the first American made atlas to equal the work of the best European firms. The atlas was well received and this established Tanner in his subsequent position as the leading American cartographic publisher. The state maps, all but two showing two states on a sheet, are wonderful historic documents of an important and dynamic period of American history. Tanner used Washington, D.C. as the prime meridian; as he explains in the introduction to the atlas, this was primarily because of a lack of an accepted European prime meridian. Each state is carefully mapped, using the most up-to-date information of physical features, towns, roads, trails, political boundaries, and other cultural details. This map of Pennsylvania and New Jersey is typical of the quality of the maps from the atlas. $1,450


Fielding Lucas, Jr. "Pennsylvania." From A General Atlas. Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1823. 11 1/4 x 17 3/4. Engraving. Full original hand color. Full margins. Very good condition.

An early map of Pennsylvania by Baltimore cartographer Fielding Lucas, Jr. (1781- 1854). Lucas appears to have become involved in the publishing and book trade while a resident of Philadelphia from 1798 to 1804, when he moved to Baltimore. In 1807 Lucas joined Conrad, Lucas & Co., and then in 1810 he set up his own business at 138 Market Street. In the second decade of the nineteenth century, through his Philadelphia contacts, Lucas was one of the major contributors to Carey & Lea's atlas of 1823. Concurrently with this involvement, Lucas brought out his own General Atlas, containing 104 maps of all parts of the world, engraved by B.T. Welch & Co. of Baltimore and Young & Delleker of Philadelphia. These maps are amongst his finest works, and they well demonstrate the quality that Lucas brought to this nascent industry. The map of Pennsylvania with its early date and interesting information, is a fine example of Lucas' work. The river systems in the state are well delineated, and the towns and road system are also shown with exacting detail. Beautifully engraved and colored, this is an excellent map of the state by an important American cartographer. $650



Finley: Pennsylvania
Anthony Finley. "Pennsylvania." From A New General Atlas. Philadelphia: A. Finley, 1825. 8 1/2 x 11 1/4. Engraving by Young & Delleker. Original hand coloring. Very good condition.

In the 1820s, Anthony Finley produced a series of fine atlases in the then leading American cartographic center, Philadelphia. Finley's work is a good example of the quality that American publishers were beginning to obtain. Each map is elegantly presented, with crisp and clear engraving and very attractive pastel hand shading. Topographical and political information is copious, including counties, towns, rivers, roads and so on. Finley's work is a good example of the quality that American publishers were beginning to obtain in the early decades of the century. Finley was very concerned to depict as up-to-date information as was possible, and thus his map presents an accurate picture of Pennsylvania in the 1820s. An excellent map from the nascent American cartographic world. $250



Carey and Lea Pennsylvania
Henry C. Carey & Isaac Lea. "Pennsylvania." Philadelphia: H.C. Carey & I. Lea, 1827. 12 x 17 3/4 (map); 16 3/4 x 20 1/2 (full sheet). Engraving by J. Yeager. Full hand color. Some discoloration along center fold. Else, very good condition.

In 1822, Henry Charles Carey and Isaac Lea published their A Complete Historical, Chronological, and Geographical American Atlas. This volume was based on Emmanuel Las Cases' Atlas Historique of 1803, with updated maps and text modified by Carey, a political economist. He considered himself an American foil to John Stuart Mill and the London economists who were proclaimers of "the gloomy science" influenced by Ricardo and Malthus. Instead of preaching overpopulation and degeneration of the human species, Carey illustrated the nations of the western hemisphere through maps that showed an expanding region with ample promise of developing into lands of great new opportunity and growth.

The sheets from this atlas, which cover North America, Central America, South America and the West Indies, are comprised of an engraved map surrounded by text documenting the history, climate, population and so forth of the area depicted. The atlas is particularly known for its excellent early maps of the states and territories of the United States. This map of Pennsylvania shows quite current detail of the state. The river systems are well mapped, and the development of the state is graphically illustrated, with towns and roads depicted throughout the state. The counties are colored with bright washes and the whole impression is very attractive. This is a fine verbal and graphic picture of the state in 1827. $525



Regional maps of Northeastern Pennsylvania. New Haven: Benjamin Silliman, 1831. From The American Journal of Science. Engravings by Amos Doolitttle. Very good condition.

In 1818, Yale professor and scientist Benjamin Silliman founded the American Journal of Science and Arts (later shortened to American Journal of Science and usually referred to as Silliman's Journal), which became the most important American scientific journal. Interestingly, the journal is still published to this day and it retains its great influence. Silliman was a geologist and chemist and the journal focused on natural sciences, particularly geology (which is the sole focus of the current magazine). These two maps fit that theme. Both were engraved by important American craftsman Amos Doolittle near the end of his career.



Hinton: Pennsylvania and New Jersey
"Map of the States of Pennsylvania and New Jersey" with inset "Plan of Philadelphia." From John H. Hinton's The History and Topography of the United States of America. London: I.T. Hinton & Simpkin & Marshall, [1830]-1832. Steel engraving by Fenner Sears & Co. With stains.

A lovely example of a steel engraving from one of the more popular nineteenth century view and map books, Hinton's History and Topography. This work contained text and numerous illustrations documenting the history and topography of the United States. Hinton used many different artists, all the engravings being made from drawings made on the spot. For their wide coverage, accurate detail, and pleasing appearance, these are amongst the finest small images of early nineteenth century America to be found anywhere. The London edition was the only one with maps of the regions throughout the United States. $200



M.R. Stealey. [Map of the mouth of the Beaver River.] From The Casket. Philadelphia: S.C. Atkinson, 1835. 6 1/4 x 11 1/4. Engraving by Melineux, Pittsburgh. With some creases and folds; repaired separation at fold. Otherwise, very good condition.

In 1826, Samuel C. Atkinson and Charles Alexander founded The Casket: Flowers of Literature, Wit and Sentiment. This monthly magazine ran until 1839, at which time it was purchased by George R. Graham. Graham soon combined it with Burton's Gentleman's Magazine and renamed the combined journal as Graham's Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine. Though it had a fairly short run, the Casket was said to be the most widely circulated monthly in the United States. It included articles, stories, poetry, puzzles, and steel engraved illustrations, and a few maps such as this rare one showing the mouth of the Beaver River in western Pennsylvania. The towns of Beaver, New Brighton and Brighton, as well as smaller settlements, are laid out along the banks of the Beaver and the Ohio. Dams and the canal are depicted, as is the nearby topography and "Part of Leets D.D. Lands." Also included is a profile of the "Falls & Dams" and an inset map showing the Beaver in relation to the surrounding region. A very rare local map of the area. $175



Thomas G. Bradford. "Pennsylvania." From Samuel G. Goodrich's A General Atlas of the World. Boston: C.D. Strong, 1841. 11 3/8 x 14. Engraving by G.W. Boynton. Original hand color. Very good condition.

Bradford's map of Pennsylvania from Samuel G. Goodrich's edition of the Bradford atlas. $325



Pennsylvania
Henry S. Tanner. "A New Map of Pennsylvania with its Canals, Rail-Roads & Distances from Place to Place along the Stave Roads." From Tanner's Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: Carey & Hart, [1840]-1844. Engraved by W. Brose. 10 1/2 x 13 3/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

In 1844, Carey & Hart issued an edition of Tanner's Universal Atlas, with updated maps of the various states. This is a fine example of the map of Pennsylvania from that atlas. This is the last edition of this map before it was transferred to lithographic stone and issued by S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr. $325



William E. Morris after John Melish. "Map of Pennsylvania, Constructed from the County Surveys authorized by the State; and other original Documents. Revised And Improved Under the supervision of Wm. E. Morris, Civil Engineer." Philadelphia: R.L. Barnes, [1848]-1849. Copyright, R.L. Barnes 1848. 50 x 74. Engraving by Edward Yeager. Original hand color. Conserved and mounted on new linen backing. Very good condition.

In 1816, the Pennsylvania State legislature passed a law to produce an official state map, and this project was given to the supervision of Philadelphia mapmaker John Melish. Melish called for each county to produce a standardized map, which he would then use to compile a full state map. He worked for six years on this map, which was finally produced in 1822, with revised editions issued in 1824, 1826, and 1832. As each of these maps was produced, one could see the internal growth and development of the state, with new roads and canals, settlements and other features making their appearance with each new issue. By the 1830s, however, it became clear that the tremendous growth of the state demanded an updated and revised version of this official state map. Civil Engineer William E. Morris was authorized to gather updated information from each county, and he proceeded to 'revise and improve' Melish's map, with the new engravings done by Philadelphia craftsman Edward Yeager. The map was copyrighted and first issued in 1848 and this example was issued a year later with some updating. The size of this map and its myriad public uses determined that the map would be issued in the format of a wall map. Its sheets were joined, mounted on canvas, and varnished so that it could be hung in public plates throughout the state. Added along the bottom of the map are several tables of information. These include: "Anthracite Coal Trade of Pennsylvania," "Public Works of Pennsylvania," "Approximate Estimate of Bituminous Coal Mined in 1847," and "Statistical Table Shewing The Prominent Features of each County." It map is a superb picture of Pennsylvania at mid-century and it is the last of the great engraved maps of the state. $6,500



Mitchell PA
"A New Map of Pennsylvania with its Canals, Rail-Roads &c." Philadelphia: S.A. Mitchell, 1849. 11 1/2 x 14 1/4. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Full original hand color. Spot in top margin. Otherwise, very good condition.

Another edition of Mitchell's fine map of the state, issued in 1849, the last year the Universal Atlas was issued by Mitchell. $325



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