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Maps of Pennsylvania

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William Scull. "A Map of Pennsylvania..." London: Sayer & Bennett, 1775. 26 3/4 x 53 1/2. Engraving. Original outline color. Tear into top margin 4 1/2" into image. Numerous short tears into right margin. Small spots in center near "Allegany Ridge" with a similar 2" stain near title. All tears expertly repaired. Strong strike with paper textures varying on original sections. Ristow, American Maps and Mapmakers, p. 53; Hansen, Pennsylvania Prints, Item 2.

A strong, attractive example of William Scull's seminal map of Pennsylvania, a map oft referred to as the 'Revolutionary War map' of the state. The information depicted on the map is far and away the most comprehensive and accurate for any map of Pennsylvania to that date, and for years thereafter; a fact that in part reflects its history. In 1759, Nicolas Scull, the Surveyor General of Pennsylvania and William Scull's grandfather, issued a map of the eastern parts of Pennsylvania commissioned by the colony's government. This was based to a great extent upon Nicolas' surveys and other first hand information, making it the standard for all subsequent maps. About ten years later, William Scull produced an updated map of Pennsylvania, basing it upon his grandfather's map as well as on his own new surveys and other information. The first edition of this map, issued in small numbers, is extremely scarce and valuable. Five years later, Sayer and Bennett issued this further updated edition in Jefferys' North American Atlas of 1775. $5,200



Lewis: Pennsylvania
Samuel Lewis after Reading Howell. "The State of Pennsylvania. reduced with permission from Reading Howells Map, by Samuel Lewis." From William Guthrie's New System of Modern Geography. Philadelphia: M. Carey, 1795. 11 1/2 x 17 7/8. Engraving by James Smither. Fine impression. Very good condition. Wheat & Brun: 442.

An important map of Pennsylvania from the American edition of Guthrie's Geography Improved. This atlas was issued in 1795 by Mathew Carey, a seminal figure in early American cartographic publishing. Carey, an Irish immigrant, established the first American specialized cartographic publishing firm. He set up an elaborate cottage system of craftsmen for engraving, printing, and coloring his maps, utilizing the best independent artists directed to a common end. Carey is important, then, not only for the excellent maps he produced, but for his setting the pattern for American map publishing, to be followed by the likes of John Melish and Henry S. Tanner.

This map of Pennsylvania, Carey's home state, is a fine example of the maps from his atlases. The map was drawn by Samuel Lewis, another important American cartographer, after Reading Howell's larger map of 1792. This map was the best map of Pennsylvania from the eighteenth century, and the first detailed map to show its proper boundaries. Its clear superiority led Carey to commission Lewis to draw a reduced version for his atlas of 1795. Topographical information is clearly portrayed with precise engraving. Information includes depictions of towns, rivers, and roads. Also shown are a few indications of the Appalachian mountains and county borders. Longitude is given both with a prime meridian at London and at Philadelphia. Overall, an important map of Pennsylvania representing the work of three important figure in American cartography. $1,250



Scott: Pennsylvania 1795
Joseph T. Scott. "Pennsylvania." From United States Gazetteer. Philadelphia: J. Scott, 1795. First state. 6 1/8 x 7 3/8. Engraving by J. Scott. With some old stains at bottom. Otherwise, very good condition. Wheat & Brun: 444

This is one of the earliest American maps of Pennsylvania, from the first American gazetteer. Joseph T. Scott, a Philadelphia engraver and publisher, issued his gazetteer during the early days of American cartography, and the maps of the individual states and territories are very good. Scott included much detail of rivers, counties, roads, and towns. This map of Pennsylvania, Scott's home state, was particularly detailed, showing many of the major sites, such as Pittsburgh and Fort Franklin, in the western part of the state. As an early example of American cartography and an fascinating document of Pennsylvania history, this is a gem. $350



Matthew Carey. "Pennsylvania." from Carey's American Pocket Atlas. Philadelphia: M. Carey, 1801. Engraving. With margins and folds as issued. Very good condition.

A map from the second edition of Carey's American Pocket Atlas, published in 1801. This is a significant, early atlas issued by Mathew Carey, the first American to specialize in cartographic publishing. Carey, an Irish immigrant, set up an elaborate cottage system of craftsmen for engraving, printing, and coloring his maps, utilizing the best independent artists directed to a common end. Carey is important, then, not only for the excellent maps he produced, but for his setting the pattern for American map publishing, to be followed by the likes of John Melish and Henry S. Tanner.

The Pocket Atlas contained 19 small folding maps of the different states and territories in the United States. Carey's maps contain the most accurate and detailed information on the country and he updated his maps for each edition of his atlas. $275



Samuel Lewis. "Pennsylvania." From A New and Elegant General Atlas by Aaron Arrowsmith and Samuel Lewis. Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Petersburg and Norfolk: Samuel Lewis, 1804. 8 x 9 5/8. Engraving by D. Fairman. Outline color. Very good condition.

An excellent map from an early American atlas. The maps were the works of Aaron Arrowsmith, one of the foremost cartographers of his era, and Samuel Lewis, one of the leaders in the nascent American cartographic field. This map of Pennsylvania is a fine example of Lewis' output. Detail of the settlement in the state, along with topographical information is neatly portrayed. Roads and counties are also shown. A fine example of some of the best American cartography of the period. $175



Carey Pennsylvania
Mathew Carey. "Pennsylvania." Philadelphia: M. Carey & son, 1814. 11 1/2 x 18 1/4. Engraving. Original outline color. Very good condition.

An important map of Pennsylvania by Mathew Carey, one of the seminal figures in early American Cartography. Published during the War of 1812, this map is from Carey's Atlas which represented the best American cartographic work of the period. Carey, an Irish immigrant, established the first American specialized cartographic publishing firm. He set up an elaborate cottage system of craftsmen for engraving, printing, and coloring his maps utilizing the best independent artists directed to a common end. Carey is important, then, not only for the excellent maps he produced, but for his setting the pattern for American map publishing, to be followed by the likes of John Melish and Henry S. Tanner. This map of Pennsylvania, Carey's home state, is a fine example of his work. Topographical information is neatly portrayed, including towns, rivers, mountains, and roads. The counties are named and indicated by light pastel coloring. Longitude is given both with a prime meridian at London and at Philadelphia. $825



Carey and Lea Pennsylvania
"Pennsylvania." From A Complete Historical, Chronological, and Geographical American Atlas. Philadelphia: H.C. Carey & I. Lea, 1822-1825. 12 x 17 3/4 (map); 16 3/4 x 20 1/2 (full sheet). Very good condition.

In 1822, Henry Charles Carey and Isaac Lea published their American Atlas. This volume was based on Emmanuel Las Cases' Atlas Historique of 1803, with updated maps and text modified by Carey, a political economist. The sheets from this atlas are comprised of an engraved map surrounded by text documenting the history, climate, population and so forth of the area depicted. This map of Pennsylvania shows excellent and very up-to-date detail, with the river systems particularly well mapped, and the development of the state is graphically illustrated, with towns and roads depicted throughout the state. $575



Henry S. Tanner. "Map of Pennsylvania and New Jersey." From New American Atlas. Philadelphia: H.S. Tanner, 1823. 20 1/2 x 27. Engraving by "H.S. Tanner & Assistants." Full original color. Slight separation and foldover at centerfold. Non-acidic mending tape on verso. Else good condition.

An impressive and important American map of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. From Tanner's seminal American Atlas, which was a monument in the early history of American cartography. Its format and size and detail made it probably the first American made atlas to equal the work of the best European firms. The atlas was well received and this established Tanner in his subsequent position as the leading American cartographic publisher. The state maps, all but two showing two states on a sheet, are wonderful historic documents of an important and dynamic period of American history. Tanner used Washington, D.C. as the prime meridian; as he explains in the introduction to the atlas, this was primarily because of a lack of an accepted European prime meridian. Each state is carefully mapped, using the most up-to-date information of physical features, towns, roads, trails, political boundaries, and other cultural details. This map of Pennsylvania and New Jersey is typical of the quality of the maps from the atlas. $1,450


Fielding Lucas, Jr. "Pennsylvania." From A General Atlas. Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1823. 11 1/4 x 17 3/4. Engraving. Full original hand color. Full margins. Very good condition.

An early map of Pennsylvania by Baltimore cartographer Fielding Lucas, Jr. (1781- 1854). Lucas appears to have become involved in the publishing and book trade while a resident of Philadelphia from 1798 to 1804, when he moved to Baltimore. In 1807 Lucas joined Conrad, Lucas & Co., and then in 1810 he set up his own business at 138 Market Street. In the second decade of the nineteenth century, through his Philadelphia contacts, Lucas was one of the major contributors to Carey & Lea's atlas of 1823. Concurrently with this involvement, Lucas brought out his own General Atlas, containing 104 maps of all parts of the world, engraved by B.T. Welch & Co. of Baltimore and Young & Delleker of Philadelphia. These maps are amongst his finest works, and they well demonstrate the quality that Lucas brought to this nascent industry. The map of Pennsylvania with its early date and interesting information, is a fine example of Lucas' work. The river systems in the state are well delineated, and the towns and road system are also shown with exacting detail. Beautifully engraved and colored, this is an excellent map of the state by an important American cartographer. $650



J. Yeager, sc. "Pennsylvania. Canals, Railroads, the Coal Regions, and Numberof Inhabitants in each County of the State." Credit reads, "Engraved for the Casket Published by S. C. Atkinson." Philadelphia: S.C. Atkinson, 1826-36. 8 1/4 x 11 1/4 (neat lines) plus margins. Engraving (hand colored). Printed on bank note paper. Former folds evident as issued. Conserved. Denver.

This small map of Pennsylvania is crammed with information on population of counties, distances by steamboats, topography, and political districts all surrounded by elegant borders provided by the famous engraver Joseph Yeager. The map once graced a monthly issue of The Casket: Flowers of Literature Wit and Sentiment (Philadelphia, 1826-36) that was published by Samuel C. Atkinson and Charles Alexander. Obviously a lesson in local geography was a necessary part of the education of polite society at the time. $275



Regional maps of Northeastern Pennsylvania. New Haven: Benjamin Silliman, 1831. From The American Journal of Science. Engravings by Amos Doolitttle. Very good condition.

In 1818, Yale professor and scientist Benjamin Silliman founded the American Journal of Science and Arts (later shortened to American Journal of Science and usually referred to as Silliman's Journal), which became the most important American scientific journal. Interestingly, the journal is still published to this day and it retains its great influence. Silliman was a geologist and chemist and the journal focused on natural sciences, particularly geology (which is the sole focus of the current magazine). These two maps fit that theme. Both were engraved by important American craftsman Amos Doolittle near the end of his career.



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