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Antique Maps of Nebraska


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Kansas and Nebraska territories
"Nebraska and Kanzas." New York: J.H. Colton & Co., ca. 1857. 12 3/4 x 15 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

An early map to focus on the northern plains east of the Rockies. New settlers were moving into the northern plains in the early 1850s, and many emigrants passed through the region on their way further west along the Oregon Trail. This area had been part of the original Missouri Territory and with the increasing population, there was a need to break it into smaller units. Thus, in 1854, the Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by Congress, setting up the two territories as they are shown in this map of but two years later. Kansas Territory is shown with its present north and south borders, but its western border extending into present-day Colorado. The Nebraska Territory is shown reaching all the way north to Canada and as far west as the "heights" of the Rocky Mountains. The territories retained this shape from 1855 until 1861 and few were made just of these territories in this configuration.

As this region was of considerable interest at the time, Colton included an impressive amount of information. Rivers, extremely important for emigrants and settlers alike, are shown with good detail, including the upper Missouri feeders, the two branches of the Platte, and the Arkansas River. Forts, such as Laramie, Atkinson, Clark, Union and many others, are clearly delineated, and Indian tribes are named and located throughout. Of particular interest are the indications of early exploration routes and the main passes over the Rocky Mountains, including the famous South Pass. An important map of an important region in the western expansion of the United States just prior to the Civil War. $350



"Johnson's Iowa and Nebraska." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1861. 17 x 22 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Short repaired tear into bottom. Otherwise, very good condition.

A detailed early map of Iowa and Nebraska at an important time in the development of both. Nebraska, which did not become a state for another five years, had lost the top two thirds of its original territory (that part became the Dakota Territory) in 1861. Most of the western emigration at the time was passing further to the south, but there was some development along the Missouri River between Iowa and Nebraska, and along the Platte River. Iowa is shown well settled here, but Nebraska has development only to the east of the 98th meridian, with the entire western part of the territory not even shown on this map. An indication is made of a proposed route for the Pacific Railroad, running through Nebraska. A detailed and interesting picture of this region just at the end of the Civil War. $165



Kansas, CO, Dakota and Nebraska territories
"Johnson's Nebraska, Dakota, Colorado, & Kansas." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1862. 12 1/2 x 15 3/8. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Very good condition.

A detailed map of northern plain states (present-day Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, the Dakotas, Wyoming and Montana). This map shows a very early configuration of this region, for in 1861 the new state of Kansas and the Nebraska Territory had been reorganized into their present configurations, but here Nebraska extends almost as far as Salt Lake City. The entire northern half of this region is shown as part of the Dakota Territory, just one year before the Idaho Territory was broken off. The detail in this map is most impressive, showing rivers, towns, forts, Indian tribes, and the early trails which criss-crossed this region. This map, issued early in the Civil War, shows these territories just before they were filled with new settlers, miners and other speculators. This is a wonderful map of an important period in the history of this region. $225



"Kansas and Nebraska." New York: J.H. Colton, 1863. 25 1/4 x 16 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand-coloring. Narrow margins around decorative border, with some chipping just into border. Browning on back at one side. One tiny spot in center. Otherwise, very good condition.

A map of the eastern parts of Nebraska and Kansas issued shortly after they took on their present-day shapes. The territories of Nebraska and Kansas were created in 1854 out of the old Missouri Territory. In 1861, Kansas attained statehood, while the Nebraska Territory lost two-thirds of its land to the newly created Dakota Territory, though it still extended to the Rocky Mountains. The western parts, beyond the 104th meridian, were detached from Nebraska in 1863, thus attaining its present configuration. This map, issued about this time, shows just the eastern parts of Nebraska and Kansas, as there was almost no development in the western parts. Detail is very good of this area, with counties, towns, rivers, Indian reservations, roads and forts clearly indicated and named. Of particular interest are the depictions of the old Santa Fe trail and the "Pony Express and U.S. Mail Route," both heading west off the map. $175



Kansas, CO, Dakota and Nebraska territories
"Johnson's Nebraska, Dakota, Colorado, Idaho & Kansas." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1863. 12 3/4 x 15 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Some smudges in margins. Else, very good condition.

A detailed map of northern plain states (present-day Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, the Dakotas, Wyoming and Montana). This map shows a configuration of this region which lasted only for one year. In 1863, the eastern part of Washington Territory and the western part of Dakota Territory were broken off to form the Idaho Territory, encompassing what today is Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. The next year the eastern part of this huge Idaho Territory, shown here, was broken off to create the Montana Territory, with the southeastern part temporarily going back into the Dakota Territory. The detail in this map is most impressive, showing rivers, towns, forts, Indian tribes, and the early trails which criss-crossed this region. This map was issued during the Pike's Peak gold rush, so the four main routes to "Auroria" (which by then had merged with Denver) are shown, the distances of the northern and southern-most routes noted on the map. $250



A.J. Johnson. "Johnson's Iowa and Nebraska." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1864. 17 x 22 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Short repaired tear into bottom. Otherwise, very good condition.

Another Johnson's map of Iowa and Nebraska, but three years later. The differences are minor, but interesting. First, Johnson makes the map a double page size and increases the part of Nebraska shown to twice the size as on the earlier map. There is little information given to this newly revealed part of the territory, except that Johnson shows the proposed route of the Pacific railroad, but the inclusion of the extended part of Nebraska clearly indicates the publisher expected this now blank part of the map to be rapidly filled in. $165



Kansas, CO, MT, Dakota and Nebraska territories
"Johnson's Nebraska, Dakota, Colorado, Montana & Kansas." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1865. 12 1/2 x 15 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Some staining and some repairs. Else, good condition.

A detailed map of northern plain states (present-day Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, the Dakotas, Wyoming, eastern Idaho and Montana). This map shows an interesting configuration of this region about 1864. By 1861 the state of Kansas and the Nebraska Territory had been reorganized into their present configurations. In 1863, the huge Dakota Territory had its western part attached to the new Idaho Territory, comprising today's Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. The next year, the northeastern part of this was created as the Montana Territory and the southeastern part was reattached to Dakota, creating a rather unusual shape for that territory. This is the political situation shown on this map. The detail is most impressive, showing rivers, towns, forts, Indian tribes, and the early trails which criss-crossed this region. This map, issued at the end of the Civil War, shows these territories just before they were filled with new settlers, miners and other speculators. This is a wonderful map of an important period in the history of this region. $185



"Map of Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado Showing also The Southern portion of Dacotah." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1866. 11 1/2 x 14. Lithograph. Full original color. Very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases issued second half of the century. This map shows the state of Kansas and the Nebraska Territory just a year before Nebraska's statehood, along with the territories of Wyoming and the southern part of "Dacotah." After the Civil War, this region was flooded with settlers, miners and others seeking new opportunities in the burgeoning American west. This map shows this area when it was the classic "Wild West" of popular lore. The eastern parts of Kansas and Nebraska are shown well settled, and in the west are shown new settlements, the newly laid railroads, forts, and Indian tribes. The southern part of the "Dacotah" territory is shown and present-day Wyoming is noted as "Idaho." With updated maps in most atlases, Mitchell pictured this fascinating part of American history and this is one of the more interesting snapshots. $225



Kansas, Nebraska, CO and Dakota territories
"Map of Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado Showing also The Southern portion of Dacotah." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1868. 11 1/2 x 14. Lithograph. Full original color. Very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases issued second half of the century. This map shows the states of Kansas and Nebraska along with the territories of Wyoming (established in 1868) and the southern part of "Dacotah." After the Civil War, this region was flooded with settlers, miners and others seeking new opportunities in the burgeoning American west. This map shows this area when it was the classic "Wild West" of popular lore. The eastern parts of Kansas and Nebraska are shown well settled, and in the west are shown new settlements, the newly laid railroads, forts, and Indian tribes. Kansas counties created by 1867 show settlement of the state westward beyond 23° west longitude. The southern part of the "Dacotah" territory is shown, as well as the Wyoming Territory. With updated maps in most atlases, Mitchell pictured this fascinating part of American history. $195



A.J. Johnson. "Johnson's Iowa and Nebraska." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1870. 17 x 22 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Separations along center fold at edges. Otherwise, very good condition.

Though the copyright date is still listed as 1864, this map clearly shows greater settlement and westward movement than the edition published in that year. By 1870, settlement had extended west along the Missouri border to towns like Council Bluffs and Omaha. In the northwestern counties, around Iowa's lake region, are still sparsely populated. $165



Mitchell Kansas and Nebraska
"County & Township Map of the States of Kansas and Nebraska." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1874. 14 1/8 x 21 3/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A Mitchell map of the two states as they were configured shortly after statehood and the completion of the transcontinental railroad. Kansas, through which the Pacific Railroad ran, was highly developed at this point, as can been clearly seen here. The Pacific R.R. is shown, as is the Atchison, Topeka & Sante Fe R.R., and a few others in the state, bringing considerable growth of towns, roads, and so forth. Nebraska shows the Union Pacific Railroad passing through, but development is considerably less, limited mostly to the east and south of the Platte River. An excellent early picture of these two plains states. $150



Gray: Nebraska
"Nebraska." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray, 1876-77. 11 3/4 x 14 7/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

An early map showing just Nebraska by itself, issued within a decade of statehood (1867). It was published by the Philadelphia firm of O.W. Gray which began its publishing around mid-century and issued regional and U.S. atlases up to the 1880s, first as O.W. Gray and then O.W. Gray & Son. This map is typical of their work, presenting the latest information available with clear and precise detail. Nebraska was well settled in the eastern parts and beginning to be developed along the Platte River, and these areas are shown broken into counties with towns, roads and railroads clearly depicted. The northwest corner of the state, the home of many Indian tribes, is left blank except for rivers. The land of Wheeler County, created in 1877 just north of Greeley County, is shown but not named. Also shown is "Garber County," whose creation by the legislature in 1875 was vetoed by Governor Silas Garber, for whom it was to be named, the area becoming the northeast corner of Custer County, created in 1877. A nice picture of the state entering the last quarter of the nineteenth century. $125



"County & Township Map Of The States of Kansas and Nebraska." From Mitchell's New General Atlas. Philadelphia: W.M. Bradley & Bro., 1884. 16 3/8 x 22 3/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A neatly detailed map from the Philadelphia publishing firm of William M. Bradley & Bros. While Philadelphia was no longer the main center of cartographic publishing in North America by the late nineteenth century, many fine maps were still produced there, as is evidenced by this map. The burgeoning states are shown with settlement spreading west from the Missouri River, trails, roads and railroads providing the transportation nexus by which this development progressed. The southwestern corner of Kansas and northwestern corner of Nebraska are still relatively underdeveloped, but this frontier in the states is clearly dwindling. $125



Arbuckle Nebraska
"Nebraska." New York: Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, 1889. Ca. 3 x 5. Chromolithograph by Donaldson Brothers. Very good condition.

From a delightful series of maps issued by the Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company. This firm was founded by John and Charles Arbuckle of Pittsburgh, PA. They developed a machine to weigh, fill, seal and label coffee in paper packages, which allowed them to become the largest importer and seller of coffee in the world. Their most famous promotional program involved the issuing of several series of small, colorful trading cards, one of which was included in every package of Arbuckle's Coffee. These series included cards with sports, food, historic scenes, and--one of the most popular--maps. The latter cards included not only a map, but also small illustrations "which portrays the peculiarities of the industry, scenery, etc." of the region depicted. These cards are a delight, containing informative maps as well as wonderful scenes of the area mapped. $60



"Nebraska." Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., ca. 1890. 19 x 26. Lithograph. Printed with color. Very good condition.

An early map from the Rand, McNally & Co. firm of Chicago. Impressive detail and showing much of the western part of the state that was still relatively undeveloped. $150



"Nebraska." From Rand-McNally Indexed Atlas. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1906. 19 x 26. Cereograph. Printed with color. Very good condition.

This large map is filled with detail, including counties, towns, railroads, roads, and much else. The "relative importance" of the towns is indicated by the size of the typeface. The map focuses on the railroads which by 1909 criss-crossed the state, the different lines indicated with red numbers referenced in a key at the lower left. $150




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