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Antique Maps of Montana

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Northern Plains 1863
"Johnson's Nebraska, Dakota, Colorado, Idaho & Kansas." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1863. 12 3/4 x 15 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Very good condition.

A detailed map of northern plain states (present-day Kansas, Nebraska,Colorado, the Dakotas, Wyoming and Montana). This map shows a configuration of this region which lasted only for one year. In 1863,the eastern part of Washington Territory and the western part of Dakota Territory were broken off to form the Idaho Territory, encompassing what today is Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. The next year the eastern part of this huge Idaho Territory, that shown here, was broken off to create the Montana Territory, with the southeastern part temporarily going back into the Dakota Territory. The detail in this map is most impressive, showing rivers, towns, forts, Indian tribes, and the early trails which criss-crossed this region. This map was issued during the Pike's Peak gold rush, so the four main routes to "Auroria" are shown, the distances of the northern and southern-most routes noted on the map. The gold rush towns of Auraria, Denver, and Montana are all shown, though the first two had by then merged into Denver. $250



Northern plains
A.J. Johnson. "Johnson's Nebraska, Dakota, Montana & Kansas." New York: Johnson & Ward, ca. 1864. 12 1/2 x 15 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Some discoloration and light spotting. Else, very good condition. Denver.

An example of Johnson's map of the northern plains issued about a year after the one above. In 1864, the Montana Territory was broken off from Idaho and this map is the first version of the Johnson map to show it thusly. The detail in this map is most impressive, showing rivers, towns, forts, Indian tribes, and the early trails which criss-crossed this region. This map, issued the end of the Civil War, shows these territories just before they were filled with new settlers, miners and other speculators. On Approval VLS



Drioux and Leroy US
M.M. Drioux & Charles Leroy. "Carte Physique et Politique des États-Unis Canada et Partie du Mexique." Paris: Eugene Belin, ca. 1861-64. From Atlas Universel et Classique. 11 1/2 x 16 1/2. Engraving by Charpentier. Full original color. Very good condition. Denver.

A fascinating map of the United States the presents a distorted attempt by French mapmakers Drioux and Leroy to keep up with the changes to the political landscape of the county between 1861 and 1864. This was a period in which new territories and states were proposed and created in a manner hard enough for an American cartographer to keep up with, but impossible for those across the Atlantic, though Drioux & Leroy did try.

In 1861, three new territories were created, Colorado, Nevada and Dakota, and each is here depicted. Interestingly, the only settlements shown in Colorado are St. Vrain's trading post, Forts Pike, Massachusetts, and Bents, Auraria and Fontaine City. Also that year, the settlers in the southern part of New Mexico tried to form a new territory, Arizona, lying south of the 34th parallel. When Arizona did come in as a territory in 1863, it came in out of the western part of New Mexico, but it is shown here in the incorrect form. In 1863, Idaho was created out of the western part of Dakota, and then a year later the northeastern part of Idaho became Montana. Both of these new territories are depicted, and labeled "Etat projetè), but here Montana is made out of the southern part of Idaho. A final political oddity is the appearance of West Virginia, created in 1862, labeled "Virginie Oc. ou Kanawaha," the latter being a name proposed at one time for the state.

Besides these interesting political divisions, the map is a lovely cartographic statement. The pastel shades highlight the states and territories and topographical information is somewhat sparse, but nicely drawn. Rivers are shown and towns and forts indicated throughout. Locations of Indian tribes are also given. $250



Colton 1864 NW
"Colton's Map of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, British Columbia & Montana." New York: J.H. Colton, 1864. 16 3/4 x 26 3/4. Lithograph. Full original hand-coloring. Very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of the northwestern part of the United States, along with southern British Columbia. This area was going through many changes in the early 1860s because of the increase settlement in the northwest, but also because of the Idaho Gold Rush (1860-63). From 1846, all of the United States west of the Rockies and north of California had consisted of the Oregon Territory and then, in 1854, of Oregon and Washington Territories. In 1863, Idaho Territory was created in the eastern part, but also including what had been the western part of the Dakota Territory to the east of the Continental Divide. This territory was too large for administrative purposes, so a year later, in 1864, the northeastern part of this large Idaho Territory was broken off as the Montana Territory. This map was issued in that year, showing the new territory. What had been the southeastern part of Idaho (essentially present-day Wyoming) was attached back to Dakota Territory, as it is shown here.

This region was a "happening" place in the 1860s and this map includes an impressive amount of information. The settlement and development of Oregon and Washington east of the Cascades is nicely illustrated, while in the eastern parts mostly Indian tribes are shown. The gold rush settlements and development in Idaho and Montana are clearly depicted, as are forts and Indian tribes. With the movement of prospectors and settlers throughout the region shown, it is particularly interesting that the map includes many of the early trails, including "Emigrant Road," "Pony Express Route," the "Overland Mail Route," and "Cherokee Trail," as well as routes of early explorers such as Fremont, Stansbury, and Mullen. $325



Mitchell Northwest 1864
"Map of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and part of Montana." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., ca. 1864. 10 3/4 x 13 3/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition. Denver.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases issued about 1864. It was that year that Montana was created as a territory out of the eastern part of Idaho. Its first capital was Bannack City, the site of the gold rush which began a couple years before. The next year the capital was moved to Virginia City, but this map shows Bannack City as the capital. Also, the southern border between Montana and what would become Wyoming was in flux and the border shown here disappeared soon, if it ever was an official border. Also of interest are the indications of the gold mines in Idaho (the reason it was settled and made into a territory), the "emigrant route" leading to Oregon and Washington, and the proposed route of the Northern Pacific Railroad. $175



Colton's Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and British Columbia 1867
"Colton's Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and British Columbia." New York: G.W. & C.B. Colton, 1867. 16 3/4 x 26 3/4. Lithograph. Full original hand-coloring. Very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of the northwestern part of the United States, along with southern British Columbia. This area was going through many changes in the 1860s because of the increase settlement in the northwest, but also because of the Idaho Gold Rush (1860-63). From 1846, all of the United States west of the Rockies and north of California had consisted of the Oregon Territory and then, in 1854, of Oregon and Washington Territories. In 1863, Idaho Territory was created in the eastern part, but also including what had been the western part of the Dakota Territory to the east of the Continental Divide. This territory was too large for administrative purposes, so a year later, in 1864, the northeastern part of this large Idaho Territory was broken off as the Montana Territory, as shown on this map just three years later. At that time, what had been the southeastern part of Idaho (essentially present-day Wyoming) was attached back to Dakota Territory, until it became its own territory in 1868. This map is one of the first to show Wyoming as its own territory, a year before the official creation of Wyoming! This "jumping the gun" by publishers was not unusual, as fierce competition often spurred the companies to try and be the first to show new developments.

This region was a "happening" place in the 1860s and this map includes an impressive amount of information. The settlement and development of Oregon and Washington east of the Cascades is nicely illustrated, while in the eastern parts mostly Indian tribes are shown. The gold rush settlements and development in Idaho and Montana are clearly depicted, as are forts and Indian tribes. With the movement of prospectors and settlers throughout the region shown, it is particularly interesting that the map includes many of the early trails, including "Emigrant Road," "Pony Express Route," the "Overland Mail Route," and "Cherokee Trail," as well as routes of early explorers such as Fremont, Stansbury, and Mullen. $285



Northern Plains 1870
"County Map of Dakota, Wyoming, Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1870. 20 x 14 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

This map shows the northern plains at a time when the railroads were opening up the region to new settlement. Completed in 1869, the transcontinental railroad ran across the center of the area shown here, from Omaha to the South Pass in western Wyoming. The railroads facilitated the movement of emigrants through and into this area--already begun by the emigration to Oregon, the California Gold Rush and Pike's Peak Gold Rush(noted on this map as "Gold Region"). This led to the creation of new states, such as Kansas (1861), Nebraska (1867), as well as territories such as Colorado, Dakota, Montana, and the just created Wyoming (1869).

This detailed map provides a good topographical picture of the region, with the rivers and mountains depicted, as are the locations of the plains Indian tribes which played such an important (and tragic) role in the opening of the west. The maps also well represents the development of this region, picturing towns, forts, roads and trails. Of particular interest is the depiction of the railroads, which are indicated sometimes following the early routes of explorers, also shown on the map. The Union Pacific Railroad, completed just the year before this map was published, is shown running through Nebraska to Cheyenne and then west, while the two railroads into Denver-one to Cheyenne to meet the Union Pacific and one directly east to Kansas City-both completed just the year this map was issued, are both shown. This is a fine map of the classic "Wild West" of popular lore. $250



Mitchell Northwest 1872
"Map of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and part of Montana." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1872. 10 3/4 x 13 3/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition. Denver.

Another version of Mitchell's map of the American northwest, dated on the map as 1872. Of note in this version is a bold dashed line crossing Montana, Idaho and Oregon, in which it branches with one route going to Wallula and one to Puget City. Though not identified, this is likely a proposed route for the Northern Pacific Railroad. $150



1874 Northern Plains
"County Map of Colorado, Wyoming, Dakota Montana." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1874. 19 1/2 x 14. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition. Denver.

A later version of the Mitchell map of the northern plains states (cf. above), which is shifted slightly to the northwest, leaving off Kansas which appeared on the earlier version. The reason for that was the establishment of Yellowstone National Park in 1872. On the earlier map, the western parts of Wyoming and Montana (then almost totally unsettled) were not included, but this map shows as far as the headwaters of the Yellowstone River and includes a depiction of the new park. The map also shows the considerable development of Colorado, which was in the middle of the silver boom. New towns and railroads are depicted, providing a good picture of the territory just two years before statehood. $225



Lloyd Northwest US 1875
"County Map of Oregon, Washington Idaho and Montana." New York: H.H. Lloyd & Co., 1875. 13 5/8 x 22 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand color. Some light smudges in margins and repaired separation at bottom centerfold. Very good condition. Denver.

A terrific map of the American northwest from just before the nation's Centennial. Washington and Oregon had developed with settlers looking for new, fertile land beginning in the 1830s and 40s. When gold and silver were later discovered in Idaho and Washington, the entire northwest began to develop, with miners, farmers and just those looking for a new life. With the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in 1869, there was a demand also for a national line further north. The Northern Pacific Railroad, to run from Wisconsin and Minnesota to Tacoma, Washington, was begun the next year. Though it had ups and downs, it was completed in 1883, providing access to the entire northwest. This excellent map shows the projected route of that railroad, along with other projected and existing rail lines. Also indicated are the various "roads" running throughout, including the "New Worked Emigrant Road," following the line of the original Oregon Trail. Other information is copious and fascinating, including myriad small towns (some now ghost towns), rivers, lakes, all set into a background of topography and political borders of the current counties. Indian information and notes on mining sites and mineral deposits completes this excellent map. $265



Idaho, Montana and Wyoming
Frank A. Gray. "Gray's Idaho, Montana and Wyoming." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray & Son, 1879. 12 x 14 3/4. Lithograph. Original color. Very good condition.

A nicely detailed and early map of the northwestern part of the United States by the Philadelphia firm of O.W. Gray. The firm began its publishing around mid-century and published regional and U.S. atlases up to the 1880s, first as O.W. Gray and then O.W. Gray & Son. This map is typical of their work, presenting the latest information available with clear and precise detail. The three territories are shown as they were originally set up in 1868; they would not be admitted as states for another decade. Detail includes topography, rivers, settlements, Indian tribes and even the early railroads both in Montana and Wyoming. Of particular interest is the depiction of Yellowstone Park, established just seven years earlier. For its attractive presentation and interesting detail make it a nice example of late nineteenth century American cartography. $225



Montana. Chicago: Geo. F. Cram, 1883. 12 1/4 x 19. Cereograph with printed color. Very good condition. Denver.

Cram's maps are known for their clear and copius detail and this map is no exception. Topography is extensively shown with hatchuring and many small towns and rivers shown throughout. Also indicated are roads and the location of Indian tribes. $115



Bradley Montana Idaho and Wyoming
"County & Township Map Montana, Idaho and Wyoming." Philadelphia: W.M. Bradley & Bro., 1883. 14 1/2 x 21 1/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Otherwise, very good condition. Denver.

A neatly detailed map from the Philadelphia publishing firm of William M. Bradley & Bros. While Philadelphia was no longer the main center of cartographic publishing in North America by the late nineteenth century, many fine maps were still produced there, as is evidenced by this map. Topography, political information, towns, and physical features are all presented precisely and clearly. The burgeoning states are shown with settlement creeping west, trails, roads and railroads providing the transportation nexus by which this development progressed. $165



Arbuckle Montana
"Montana." New York: Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, 1889. Ca. 3 x 5. Chromolithograph by Donaldson Brothers. Very good condition.

From a delightful series of maps issued by the Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company. This firm was founded by John and Charles Arbuckle of Pittsburgh, PA. They developed a machine to weigh, fill, seal and label coffee in paper packages, which allowed them to become the largest importer and seller of coffee in the world. Their most famous promotional program involved the issuing of several series of small, colorful trading cards, one of which was included in every package of Arbuckle's Coffee. These series included cards with sports, food, historic scenes, and--one of the most popular--maps. The latter cards included not only a map, but also small illustrations "which portrays the peculiarities of the industry, scenery, etc." of the region depicted. These cards are a delight, containing informative maps as well as wonderful scenes of the area mapped. $65



Montana. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1899. 12 1/2 x 19. Cereograph with printed color. Very good condition. Denver.

Highly detailed and with an inset of the "Territory between Butte and Helena." $95



Lloyd Edwin Smith. "Montana." From the Commercial Atlas of the World. Ed. by Frederick J. Branom. Chicago: Geographical Publishing Company, 1931. Folio. Chromolithograph. Excellent condition. Denver.

An attractive and detailed map of the state from the early part of the twentieth century. $75



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