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Antique Maps of Indiana

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Lucas Indiana
Fielding Lucas, Jr. "Indiana." Philadelphia: H.C. Carey & I. Lea, 1827. 11 1/4 x 8 3/4 (map); 16 1/2 x 20 3/4 (full sheet). Engraving by J.H. Young. Full, original hand coloring. Very good condition.

In 1822, Henry Charles Carey and Isaac Lea published their A Complete Historical, Chronological, and Geographical American Atlas. This volume was based on Emmanuel Las Cases' Atlas Historique of 1803, with updated maps and text modified by Carey, a political economist. He considered himself an American foil to John Stuart Mill and the London economists who were proclaimers of "the gloomy science" influenced by Ricardo and Malthus. Instead of preaching overpopulation and degeneration of the human species, Carey illustrated the nations of the western hemisphere through maps that showed an expanding region with ample promise of developing into lands of great new opportunity and growth.

The sheets from this atlas, which cover North America, Central America, South America and the West Indies, are comprised of an engraved map surrounded by text documenting the history, climate, population and so forth of the area depicted. The atlas is particularly known for its excellent early maps of the states and territories of the United States. This map of Indiana is particularly interesting in showing the development of the state at this early stage in its history, for Indiana was made a state a decade earlier in April 1816. The earliest settlement in Indiana came from the south, along the Ohio River, so this area is broken into counties and shows towns and roads. By the late 1820s, this development extended to just north of Indianapolis, with the rest of the state shown as Indian territory except for Allen County with the settlement around Fort Wayne. The list of governors includes three, the latest being James B. Ray, elected in 1825. A terrific visual and textural picture of Indiana. $650



"Ohio & Indiana" Connecticut: D.F. Robinson & Co., 1830. 7 1/2 x 9 1/2. Engraving. Original hand color. Very good condition. $65



Burr Indiana
David H. Burr. "Indiana." From Universal Atlas. New York: Illman & Pilbrow, 1833. 12 1/4 x 10 1/2. Engraving by Illman & Pilbrow. Full original color. Very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of Indiana by David H. Burr, one of the most important American cartographers of the first part of the nineteenth century. Having studied under Simeon DeWitt, Burr produced the second state atlas issued in the United States, of New York in 1829. He was then appointed to be geographer for the U.S. Post Office and later geographer to the House of Representatives. The map shows the state at a relatively early date of its development, with the northern part still shown as Indian territory. The route of the proposed canal from Wayne (on the Wabash) to Logansport (on the Fox River) is shown. The map indicates each county with a different color and towns and cities are noted throughout. With his access to information from the Post Office, Burr's depiction of the road system is accurate and up-to-date. Burr's maps are scarce and quite desirable. $450



Bradford Indiana Ohio
Thomas G. Bradford. "Indiana & Ohio." From Atlas Designed to Illustrate The Abridgement of Universal Geography. Philadelphia: Desilver, Thomas & Co., 1835. Quarto. 7 7/8 x 10. Engraving by G.W. Boynton & Co. Original hand color. Very good condition. Denver.

A nice map from Boston publisher and cartographer, Thomas G. Bradford. Issued in 1835, Bradford's Atlas contained maps of the different United States and other parts of the world, based on the most up-to-date information available at the time. Towns, rivers, lakes, and some orography are depicted. Counties are named and indicated with original outline color. Because Bradford continued to update his maps as he issued them in different volumes, this political information is very interesting for historic purposes. This map is interesting as it shows the states at an early stage in their development. Of note is the indication of Indian tribes and of railroads and canals in both states. This is a good representation of American cartography in the fourth decade of the nineteenth century and an interesting document of regional history. $95



Tanner Indiana
H.S. Tanner. "A New Map of Indiana with its Roads & Distances." From Tanner's Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: H.S. Tanner, 1841. 13 5/8 x 11 1/8. Engraving. Full original hand color. A few smudges in map, otherwise very good condition.

A detailed map of Indiana by the great American cartographer, Henry Schenck Tanner. In 1816, Henry, his brother Benjamin, John Vallance and Francis Kearny formed an engraving firm in Philadelphia. Having had experience at map engraving through his work with John Melish, Tanner conceived of the idea of compiling and publishing an American Atlas, which was begun in 1819 by Tanner, Vallance, Kearny & Co.. Soon Tanner took over the project on his own, and thus began his career as cartographic publisher. The American Atlas was a huge success, and this inspired Tanner to produce his Universal Atlas, of more manageable size. This atlas contained excellent maps of each state, focusing on the transportation network, including roads, railroads and canals. All details are clearly presented, and these include towns, rivers, mountains, political boundaries and the transportation information. The maps were later purchased by S. Augustus Mitchell, and then Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., but it is these early Tanner editions which are the rarest and most important. This map of Indiana is a good example of this work. Each county is indicated with a contrasting pastel shade, and the state is cris-crossed with roads, railroads and canals. A profile of the Wabash and Erie Canal is shown at the right and on the left is a table of steam boat routes. This is a very fine example of early American cartography at its best. $225



Bradford Indiana
Thomas G. Bradford. "Indiana." From Samuel G. Goodrich's A General Atlas of the World. Boston: C.D. Strong, 1841. 14 1/4 x 11 3/8. Engraving by G.W. Boynton. Original hand color. Some minor spots in margins. Very good condition.

An attractive and early map of Indiana by Thomas Bradford. This map was first issued in the 1838 edition of Bradford's atlas, but this example appeared in Samuel Goodrich's atlas from 1841. The map shows the social, political and transportation situation in the state at the time. This was issued at a period of rapid growth in the state through the immigration of settlers from further east. This was spurred by the opening of the interior of Indiana through the building of canals and railroads, which allowed the farm produce grown there to reach the hungry markets of the East Coast. This map nicely depicts the early network of railroads and canals that were so crucial in the history of the state. Counties are named and indicated in contrasting shades, and rivers, lakes, and towns are precisely depicted. A nice picture of Indiana near the middle of the nineteenth century. $325



Thomas G. Bradford. "Indiana." From A Universal Illustrated Atlas. Boston: Charles D. Strong, [1838]-1842. 14 1/4 x 11 3/8. Engraving by G.W. Boynton. Original hand color. Very good condition.

Another version of Bradford's map of Indiana shown above, but published a year later for a different atlas. $325



Tanner Indiana
H.S. Tanner "A New Map of Indiana with its Roads & Distances." Philadelphia: Carey & Hart, 1844. 12 7/8 x 10 3/4. Engraving. Full original hand color. Full margins. Excellent condition.

A detailed map of Indiana by the great American cartographer, Henry Schenck Tanner. In 1816, Henry, his brother Benjamin, John Vallance and Francis Kearny formed an engraving firm in Philadelphia. Having had experience at map engraving through his work with John Melish, Tanner conceived of the idea of compiling and publishing an American Atlas, which was begun in 1819 by Tanner, Vallance, Kearny & Co.. Soon Tanner took over the project on his own, and thus began his career as cartographic publisher. The American Atlas was a huge success, and this inspired Tanner to produce his Universal Atlas, of more manageable size. This atlas contained excellent maps of each state, focusing on the transportation network, including roads, railroads and canals. All details are clearly presented, and these include towns, rivers, mountains, political boundaries and the transportation information. The maps were later purchased by S. Augustus Mitchell, and then Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., but it is these early Tanner editions which are the rarest and most important.

This map of Indiana is a good example of this work. Each county is indicated with a contrasting pastel shade, and the state is cris-crossed with roads, railroads and canals. A profile of the Wabash and Erie Canal is shown at the right and on the left is a table of steam boat routes. This is a very fine example of early American cartography at its best. $275



"A New Map of Indiana with its Roads & Distances." From A New Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1849. 14 x 11 1/2. Lithgraphic transfer from engraved plate. Full original hand color. Full margins. Very good condition.

An fine map of Indiana by S. Augustus Mitchell, Sr. For much of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the Mitchell firm dominated American cartography in output and influence. S. Augustus Mitchell Jr.'s maps of the 1860s are probably the best known issues of this firm, but his father's earlier efforts are excellent maps derived from H.S. Tanner's atlas of the 1830s. This early map of Indiana is a good example of this work and was one of the best maps of the state issued to that time. Of particular note on this map is the indication of the transportation network-roads, canals and railroads-throughout the state. Included at the right side is a profile of the Wabash and Erie Canal and on the left is a list of the stops and distances on the steam board routes in the state. A superior map of the state just prior to mid-century. $275



"A New Map of Indiana with its Roads & Distances." Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1850. 11 1/2 x 13 3/4. Engraving. Full original hand color. Full margins. Excellent condition.

A strong and beautifully crafted map of Indiana from the mid-nineteenth century, published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co. This firm took over the publication of S. Augustus Mitchell's important Universal Atlas in 1850, and they continued to produce up-dated maps that were amongst the best issued in the period. This map shows Indiana as a well developed state at mid-century. It is filled with myriad topographical details, including rivers, marshes, towns, and county borders. This firm's maps are especially known for their depiction of the transportation routes of the states, and this map is no exception. The transportation infrastructure was extremely important at this period of increased immigration and travel in the American mid-west. This information is clearly depicted, including railroads, canals and roads. At the top left is a table showing distances along steamboat routes from Louisville to Pittsburgh and Louisville to New Orleans. To the right is a profile of the Wabash and Erie Canal. The map has a rather striking appearance, with warm hand coloring, that well compliments the clear presentation. For its fascinating detail and decorative appeal, this is an excellent Indiana document. $225



Two maps of Indiana by J.H. Colton & Co. from New York. 14 x 11 1/4. Lithographs with full original hand-coloring. Very good condition.

Two colorful, detailed maps of the state of Indiana from the middle nineteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of map publishing in America moved from Philadelphia to New York. The Colton publishing firm played a large role in this shift. These maps of Indiana, with such fine detail, are strong examples of their successful work. The maps present counties in contrasting pastel shades, and include depictions of towns, roads, railroads, rivers, and some topography. Each feature is labeled neatly, and the information given extends beyond the borders of the state. Each is an attractive map as well as an interesting historical document. The earlier map has a decorative border as shown.



"A New Map of Indiana with its Roads & Distances." Philadelphia: Charles Desilver, 1856. 14 x 11 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition. With decorative border.

Charles Desilver, one of the many publishers working in Philadelphia during the mid-nineteenth century, issued an atlas of maps based on the famous Tanner-Mitchell-Cowperthwait series. Desilver used much the same information as originally drawn in the 1840s, but updated the maps with new counties, roads, towns, and especially the transportation network of canals, roads and railroads, always the focus of the maps from this series. This map is typical of the rather unusual and scarce Desilver atlas. The growth of roads and railroads across the state is impressive and indicative of the huge growth in the region during the middle part of the century. An attractive and fascinating Indiana document. $175



J.C. Smith Midwest
J. Calvin Smith. "Guide Through Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin, & Iowa." New York: J. H. Colton & Co., 1856. 21 x 25. Lithograph by S. Stiles, Sherman & Smith. Full original hand-color. Printed on banknote paper with folds as issued. Some minor breaks at folds. Overall, very good condition.

A striking, separately issued map of the midwest by John Calvin Smith, a New York surveyor and publisher who specialized in the area. This folding maps was intended for use especially by the myriad new emigrants to the nation's center who were arriving in large numbers in the middle nineteenth century. The map presents a highly detailed and accurate view of the region on the eve of the Civil War, an important time for the midwest. The states and territories of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa are shown with varying amounts of information, reflecting their different stages of development, from almost fully settled Ohio to the relative undeveloped Iowa and Minnesota. Information depicted includes towns, postal stations, rivers, lakes, roads, canals, railroads and townships; also indicated is the survey grid-work for the U. S. Survey underway at the time. In an insert in the top right corner contains census data from the 1850 national census. $750



J. Calvin Smith. "Guide Through Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin, & Iowa." New York: J. H. Colton & Co., 1856. 21 x 25. Lithograph by S. Stiles, Sherman & Smith. Full original hand-color. Issued in and accompanied here by Colton's Traveler and Tourist's Guide-Book. Printed on bank note paper with folds as issued. Some discoloration and staining, and tiny holes at folds. Overall, very good condition.

Another example of the map above, in not quite as good condition, but with the guide book in which it was issued. $675



Mitchell: Ohio and Indiana
"County Map of Ohio and Indiana." Philadelphia: S.A. Mitchell Jr., 1864. 11 1/2 x 14. Lithograph. Original hand color. Small chips at left margin corners. Else, very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases, and it shows Ohio and Indiana in the 1860s. Towns, rivers, roads and other topographical information are clearly shown, and the counties are shaded with contrasting pastel colors. A fine decorative border surrounds the map, and the whole effect makes for an attractive mid-nineteenth century map. $110



Johnson Indiana
"Johnson's Indiana." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1864. 23 1/8 x 17 1/8. Lithograph. Full original hand-color. Very good condition.

An attractive map of Indiana from A. J. Johnson's mid-nineteenth century atlas of the world. Johnson, who published out of New York City, was one of the leading cartographic publishers in the latter half of the century, producing popular atlases, geographies and so on. This finely detailed map is a good example of Johnson's, and thus early American, cartography. Townships, towns, roads, rail lines, rivers and lakes are shown throughout. The clear presentation of cartographic information and the warm hand coloring make this an attractive as well as interesting historical document. $165



Three maps of Ohio and Indiana by S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr. of Philadelphia. Lithographs with full original hand-coloring.

S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., of Philadelphia, was one of the largest map publishers of the middle of the nineteenth century. The firm was founded by his father, who from around the middle of the nineteenth century issued atlases and maps of all parts of the world in all formats. The Mitchell atlases contained up-to-date maps which were as attractive as they were accurate. With bold hand-coloring, decorative borders, and interesting information from this interesting period of American history, these are fine examples of the Mitchell firm's output.



Colton Indiana
"Colton's New Map of Indiana." New York: G. W. and C. B. Colton & Co., 1866. 15 3/4 x 12 3/4. Lithograph. Full original hand-coloring. Very good condition. $140



Gray Indiana
Frank A. Gray. "Indiana." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray & Son, ca. 1876. 25 1/8 x 16 1/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

An attractive, detailed and large map of Indiana. This map demonstrates the railroad's dominance on the terrain and local economy as many railroad lines criss cross the state, converging at industrial centers like Indianapolis and Fort Wayne. Published by the Philadelphia firm of O.W. Gray which began its publishing around mid-century and published regional and U.S. atlases up to the 1880s, first as O.W. Gray and then O.W. Gray & Son. This map is typical of their work, presenting the latest information available with clear and precise detail. $125



Black Illinois Ohio Indiana
"Illinois, Indiana & Ohio." Edinburgh: A. & C. Black, 1884. 11 x 16. Colored lithograph. Very good condition. $45



"Colton's Indiana." New York: G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co., 1886. Separately issued. 15 1/2 x 12 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Full margins. Printed on bank not paper and folded into original buckram binding. Excellent condition. Denver.

A detailed, separately issued folding map of Indiana from the Colton firm of New York. Throughout the nineteenth century, separately issued maps played an important role in American life. Used by immigrants, travelers, and businessmen, these maps were crucial to the public in that increasingly mobile age. The Colton firm specialized in travelers' maps such as this, which would have been sold in New York and through dealers around the country. Interestingly, this map has an embossed note that it was given out with "Compliments Of Aug. T. Post. Banker 25 Nassau St., New York." Most such maps would have been destroyed or severely damaged through use, but this example has survived in pristine condition. The map shows excellent detail of towns, political divisions, rivers, lakes and the road and railroad network. $475
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Bradley Indiana
"Indiana." Philadelphia: W.M. Bradley & Bro., 1887. 14 1/4 x 11 1/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A neatly detailed map from the Philadelphia publishing firm of William M. Bradley & Bros. While Philadelphia was no longer the main center of cartographic publishing in North America by the late nineteenth century, many fine maps were still produced there, as is evidenced by this map. Topography, political information, towns, and physical features are all presented precisely and clearly. The transportation network is particularly well delineated. $50



Arbuckle Indiana
"Indiana." New York: Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, 1889. Ca. 3 x 5. Chromolithograph by Donaldson Brothers. Very good condition.

From a delightful series of maps issued by the Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company. This firm was founded by John and Charles Arbuckle of Pittsburgh, PA. They developed a machine to weigh, fill, seal and label coffee in paper packages, which allowed them to become the largest importer and seller of coffee in the world. Their most famous promotional program involved the issuing of several series of small, colorful trading cards, one of which was included in every package of Arbuckle's Coffee. These series included cards with sports, food, historic scenes, and--one of the most popular--maps. The latter cards included not only a map, but also small illustrations "which portrays the peculiarities of the industry, scenery, etc." of the region depicted. These cards are a delight, containing informative maps as well as wonderful scenes of the area mapped. $60




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