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Antique Maps of Florida

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Ortelius regions of the New World
Abraham Ortelius. "La Florida. Auctore Hieron. Chiaves."/ "Peruviae Aurieferae Regionis Typus. Didaco Mendezio Auctore."/ "Guastecan Reg." From Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Antwerp, [1584]. 6 x 8 3/4; 13 x 8 3/4; 6 3/4 x 8 3/4, respectively. Overall 13 x 18. Engraving. Original hand color. Very good condition. French text on verso.

A three-part map of the New World by Abraham Ortelius, the 'father of modern cartography.' Of particular importance is the first printed map of the American southeast, the fascinating "La Florida," as the southeast was called at the time, stretching along the Atlantic from the Carolinas to the Mexican coast. This map is based on actual information gathered during De Soto's explorations of the area in the early 1540s, and it presents the first printed image of the interior of the American southeast, showing Indian settlements, mountains and waterways discovered by De Soto. The other two maps on the sheet are of present-day Peru (the source of gold and silver for the Spanish) and eastern Mexico. Together, the three maps describe in wonderful detail and decorative form the most significant parts of the New World in the second half of the sixteenth century. They show the source of Spanish gold in three juxtaposed panels that are fit together to convey maximum cartographic information. The maps are the unmistakable work of Abraham Ortelius, considered to be one of the two greatest cartographers of the sixteenth century, and whose Theatrum Orbis Terrarum was the first modern atlas. This printing first appeared in the third supplement to the atlas, the 1584 Additamentum. Containing the earliest printed map of the southeast and with two other maps of regions of central importance to early American history, this is a map of highest interest to the American collector. $2,850



St. Augustine
Jacques N. Bellin. "Plan du Port de St. Augustin dans la Floride." From Le Petit Atlas Maritime. Paris: J.N. Bellin, 1764. 8 1/8 x 6 1/4. Engraving. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A map of St. Augustine and its approaches by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, the Hydrographer to the King of France. From about 1650 to 1750, the French dominated the cartographic world, with their fine, scientifically based maps, elegantly engraved and precisely detailed. Bellin (1703-72) was one of the best in the later period. Bellin's specialty was marine charts and this is a good example of his output. Though quite a small map, it contain much information, such as the basic layout of the town and its fort and the soundings of the navigational entrance to the harbor. A fine eighteenth century map of Florida. $500



Fielding Lucas Jr. "Florida." Philadelphia: H.C. Carey & I. Lea., 1822. 11 1/2 x 9 1/2 (map); 16 5/8 x 20 7/8 (full sheet). Engraving. Original hand color. Very light smudge of color at bottom of map. Very good condition.

In 1822, Henry Charles Carey and Isaac Lea published their A Complete Historical, Chronological, and Geographical American Atlas. This volume was based on Emmanuel Las Cases' Atlas Historique of 1803, with updated maps and text modified by Carey, a political economist. He considered himself an American foil to John Stuart Mill and the London economists who were proclaimers of "the gloomy science" influenced by Ricardo and Malthus. Instead of preaching overpopulation and degeneration of the human species, Carey illustrated the nations of the western hemisphere through maps that showed an expanding region with ample promise of developing into lands of great new opportunity and growth.

The sheets from this atlas, which cover North America, Central America, South America and the West Indies, are comprised of an engraved map surrounded by text documenting the history, climate, population and so forth of the area depicted. The atlas is particularly known for its excellent early maps of the states and territories of the United States. This map of Florida is typical of his maps. The map itself was drawn by the important Baltimore cartographer Fielding Lucas Jr. This is the first map of Florida as a territory, issued just after it was transferred to the United States from Spain in 1821. The text describes what was then known about the territory (not a lot) and a long history up to the Seminole Wars and the transfer of the territory from Spain. The map shows mostly rivers and lakes, as best was known, with the few settlements and forts in the north. This is a wonderful verbal and graphic picture of Florida. $850



Territory of Florida
David H. Burr. "Map of the Territory of Florida." From A New Universal Atlas (1835). New York: Illman & Pilbrow, 1834. 12 1/2 x 10 1/4. Engraving by W.F.H. & J.H. Full original color. A few stains on right side. Otherwise, very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of the territory of Florida by David H. Burr, one of the most important American cartographers of the first part of the nineteenth century. Having studied under Simeon DeWitt, Burr produced the second state atlas issued in the United States, of New York in 1829. He was then appointed to be geographer for the U.S. Post Office and later geographer to the House of Representatives. The map shows Florida over a decade before statehood, when there was little development other than along the panhandle. Each county is highlighted with a different color; with ten counties in the north and almost the entire peninsula shown as a single county, St. Johns. Towns and cities are shown, as are the roads. With his access to information from the Post Office, Burr's depiction of the road system is accurate and up-to-date. Burr's maps are scarce and quite desirable. $925



After Tanner. "North America XIV: Florida."London: SDUK, 1834. 16 1/8 x 13 1/2 (full sheet). Engraving by J. & C. Walker. Original outline hand-coloring. Very good condition.

A precise and cleanly drawn map of Florida by the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK). This wonderful English enterprise was devoted to the spreading of up-to-date information and the enhancing of understanding. This crisply drawn map of Florida is an important early rendering of the state. It is based on the work of Tanner, an influential American cartographer. The careful detail and fine engraving show off the SDUK work at its best. $375



Tanner Florida
Henry S. Tanner. "Florida." From Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: Carey & Hart, [1839]-1842/43. 13 1/4 x 10 7/8. Engraving. Full original hand coloring. Small spot in Tallahassee inset. Otherwise, very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of Florida by the great American cartographer, Henry Schenck Tanner. In 1816, Henry, his brother Benjamin, John Vallance and Francis Kearny formed an engraving firm in Philadelphia. Having had experience at map engraving through his work with John Melish, Tanner conceived of the idea of compiling and publishing an American Atlas, which was begun in 1819 by Tanner, Vallance, Kearny & Co.. Soon Tanner took over the project on his own, and thus began his career as cartographic publisher. The American Atlas was a huge success, and this inspired Tanner to produce his Universal Atlas, of more manageable size. This atlas contained excellent maps of each state, focusing on the transportation network, including roads, railroads and canals. In 1842/43, Carey & Hart issued an edition of the atlas, and the maps were later purchased by S. Augustus Mitchell, and then Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co.. Maps from the early Tanner/Carey & Hart edition are very rare. This map of Florida is typical of the Tanner maps, and it shows the state at an interesting stage of its history. Included are inset maps of Pensacola, Tallahassee, and St. Augustine. $525



Thomas G. Bradford. "Florida." From Samuel G. Goodrich's A General Atlas of the World. Boston: C.D. Strong, 1841. 14 1/4 x 11 1/2. Engraving by G.W. Boyton. Original hand color, but reds faded. Small group of spots on coast. Otherwise, very good condition.

An early map of the Florida Territory from Goodrich's edition of Bradford's important atlas. The map was issued near the end of the Second Seminole War, four years before Florida became a state. At this stage of its development, settlement was almost exclusively in the north, indicated by the smaller and numerous counties shown there in contrasting shades. The map shows a good number of towns in the north, and forts throughout, including many in the south related to the current Indian war. The south consists of just four counties; the Everglades are indicated and marked as "unexplored." One of the best maps of Florida territory. $625



"Florida." New York: J.H. Colton & Co., 1855. 12 1/2 x 15 1/2. Lithograph. Full original hand color. A few light spots. Very good condition. With inset of Florida keys.

In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of map publishing in America moved from Philadelphia to New York. The Colton publishing firm played a large role in this shift. This map of Florida, with its fine detail, is a strong example of their successful work. The map presents the counties with contrasting pastel shades, and includes depictions of towns, roads, railroads, rivers, and some other topography. Each feature is labeled neatly, and the information given extends to just beyond the borders of the state. An inset "Plan of the Florida Keys" is in the lower left. This is an attractive map as well as an interesting historical document. $250



"County Map of North Carolina,"/"County Map of South Carolina," with inset "Map of Charleston Harbor,"/"County Map of Florida." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell Jr., 1866. 13 7/8 x 11 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Decorative border. Spots in western Florida and into Gulf; else very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell Sr. dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases, and it shows the Carolinas and Florida in the mid-1860s, shortly after the Civil War. Towns, rivers, roads and other topographical information are clearly shown, and the counties are shaded with contrasting pastel colors. A fine decorative border surrounds the map, and the whole effect makes for an attractive and historically interesting mid-nineteenth century map. $185



Mitchell Florida
"County Map of Florida." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1867. Lithograph. Original hand-coloring. Some slight smudging in margins. Else, very good condition. With inset of "Mobile."

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases. The Mitchell firm's maps are known for their precision and great detail. Mitchell gathered the best current information available, and depicted it with great clarity. Information shown includes rivers, lakes, swamps, and islands. Also shown are towns, railroads, and political borders. This map has a detailed city plan of Mobile in the lower left and it is graced with the typical Mitchell vine-leaf border. $225



Gray Florida 1875
"Florida." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray, 1875. 11 1/4 x 14 1/4. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition. Denver.

A nicely detailed map of the state of Florida by the Gray map publishing firm out of Philadelphia. The map shows the towns, rivers, mountains, counties, and canals in the state in the year before the nation's centennial. Of particular interest are the railroads, which crisscross the northern part of the state, and the inset map of the Florida Keys. A lovely and colorful map of Florida. JT OUT ON APPROVAL



Mitchell Florida 1880
"County Map of Florida." From Mitchell's New General Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr., 1880. 10 1/2 x 13 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand-coloring. With waterstain in left margin. Otherwise, very good condition. With inset: "Mobile." Denver.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases. The Mitchell firm's maps are known for their precision and great detail. Mitchell gathered the best current information available, and depicted it with great clarity. Information shown includes rivers, lakes, swamps, and islands. Also shown are towns, railroads, and political borders. This map has a detailed city plan of Mobile in the lower left and it is graced with the typical Mitchell vine-leaf border. $175



Tunison's Florida
"Tunison's Florida." Jacksonville, Illinois: H.C. Tunison, 1885. Wax engraving. Original color. 12 1/4. x 9 3/4. Very good condition. Denver.

A handsome map of Florida from Tunison's Peerless Universal Atlas. With the development of wax engraving (cerography), more maps and atlases were, for the first time, easily produced in cities beyond the major printing centers of New York, Philadelphia and Chicago. Henry C. Tunison issued a series of fine atlases beginning in 1885 and lasting into the beginning of the twentieth century. This is a nice example of his output, showing the sunshine state. Also includes an interesting inset of the mouth of the Mississippi river with text about the attempt, in 1875, to open up the South Pass. VS




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